Conferences

Upcoming! Sixth Annual Genderevolution conference, Salt Lake City UT

Sixth Annual Genderevolution 2014 Conference: Love Your Queer Body

Saturday, November 15th, 2014

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The purpose of the Genderevolution is to:

  • Foster community building among trans* folk and allies alike, to help create a strong and safe space to push gender boundaries in the Salt Lake City area.
  • Educate employees, cisgender/non-trans* folk, trans* folk, health and mental care providers, and allies about the myths and realities of gender.
  • Celebrate trans* identities in an inclusive, healthy and positive way.utah-pride-center

At the 6th Annual Gender Conference, over 400 attendees are expected, and aims are to deconstruct gender mythology, explore the implications of socially constructed gender norms, and integrate our many intersecting identities.

We are all members of various communities, how do these memberships affect each other? How does our experience with gender intersect with our experience of race? Of class or sexuality or relationship styles? How about religion, physical dis/ability, or political ideology? Maybe we won’t find clear answers to these questions, but in asking them perhaps we can come to understand ourselves—and each other—just a little better.

 LGBT HealthLink is the official sponsor of the 2014 Wellness track! The track will include sessions on:

Trans 101 in Spanish
Surgical Outcomes for Vagioplasty
Trust & Resonance in Relationships (by the LGBTQ Affirmative Therapists Guild of Utah)
WPATH (World Professional Association for Transgender Health): What you need to know
Fitness & Transition
Gynecology for Trans* Patients
Smoking out a Deadly Threat (by our very own steering committee member, Gabe Glissmeyer)

Keynote:

The keynote speaker is Pat Manuel, a trans/off-binary boxer and transmasculine fitness advocate.
Pat Manuel
Pat Manuel

Pat Manuel, also known as “Cacahuate(Peanut)” is a transmasculine QPOC who has shaped his masculine identity in boxing gyms around Los Angeles, CA. A 5x national amateur champion, Pat was a participant in the first ever Women’s Olympic Boxing Trials and was the only vocally out queer fighting in the history of USA Boxing’s Olympic Box-Offs. Medically disqualified after the first fight of the tournament, Pat struggled with ways other than visibility to aide his community. Since joining the Brown Boi Project in 2013, he has decided to use his knowledge as a trainer and athlete to empower other through physical fitness. Pat created Buffbutch.com, a website intending to fill the void of queer fitness interests. When he isn’t training, Pat is usually fond of enjoying cookies and dreaming of becoming a giant robot pilot.

Conferences · Cultural Competency Trainings · Data · Funding · LGBT Policy · Research Studies · Resources · scholarship

#BWLBGTI Day 2 Post-Lunch: Revisiting sexual health

dwayne

Dwayne Steward 
LGBTQ Health Advocate
Columbus Public Health

After lunch at day 2 of the LGBTI Health Research Conference at Baldwin Wallace is all about sexual health. Historically this would have been the bulk of such a conference as this. As most of us know, pathology-focused research on homosexuality and gender diversity, along with the stigma associated with the HIV/AIDS epidemic forced LGBTI healthcare into a sexual health box for many years. It’s interesting to see that the pendulum is swinging back the other way in some ways as we as LGBTI healthcare workers/researchers are now having to convince certain communities that sexual health is still an important factor of the LGBTI health experience.

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Dr. Anthony Silvestre, professor of Infectious Disease and Microbiology at the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh, opened with a lunch-time keynote on the history of sexual health research, reminding us how far we’ve come regarding the study of sex and sexuality in this country. He than joined Dr. Brian Dodge, Indiana University-Bloomington School of Public Health, for the “LGBTI Health Training” seminar track, which included a lively discussion on the changing landscape of HIV and intersectionality in public health research.

There was definitely a lot of talk about training program models in Indiana and Pennsylvania, but through the lens of sexual health research. Dr. Silvestre spoke on University of Pittsburgh’s LGBT health certificate program along with several other LGBT-focused specialized programs the university offers, including a post-doctorate program that specialized in MSM (men who have sex with men) healthcare.

Dr. Dodge made several interesting conjectures about the study of sexual health saying, much of the conversation regarding sexual health has been risk based. “We need to be including more about the actual pleasure of sex and begin taking a more sex-positive approach. It is okay for gay sex to be enjoyable,” he said. He went on to say that programs should take a more competency-based approach to better prepare students for their post-college endeavors.

My fellow Network for LGBTQ Health Equity scholarship recipients Heru Kheti (middle) and E.Shor (right).
My fellow Network for LGBTQ Health Equity scholarship recipients Heru Kheti (middle) and E.Shor (right).

Dr. Francisco Sy, director of the Office of Community-Based Participatory Research and Collaboration at the NIH/National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), took a moment to educate the audience on the NIH grant process and how to best navigate their grant application process. But the day’s real winner was Dr. Erin Wilson’s presentation, “HIV Among Trans-Female Youth: What We Now Know and Directions for Research and Prevention.” Dr. Wilson, who is a former NIMHD Loan Repayment Program (LRP) recipient and research scientist currently with the AIDS Office at the San Francisco Department of Public Health, quickly (due to time constraints) spoke on her ground-breaking NIH-funded research on the social determinants of health that led to high HIV-infection rates for transgender female youth in Los Angeles.

The statistics Dr. Wilson reported were pretty staggering. She prefaced much of her presentation by saying her studies were very specific to L.A. and she had no research to show that this was reflective of the national transgender female population. She reported finding that transgender females in L.A. were 34 times more likely to contact HIV than the general population and at the time of her study nearly 70 percent of transgender female youth in L.A. participated in sex work. As a result of her work The SHINE Study was created, the first longitudinal study of trans*female youth that still continues today. Though nearly 40 percent of transgender females in L.A. are living with HIV only 5 percent are youth. “We have a great opportunity to get ahead of this disparity and create some real change,” she said.

That’s all for today my friends. Check back tomorrow for a full report on Day 3 of the Baldwin Wallace University LGBTI Health Research Conference (#BWLGBTI)!

Conferences · Cultural Competency Trainings · Data · LGBT Policy · Presentations · Resources · scholarship

#BWLGBTI Day 2: Perfect time, perfect place

dwayne

Dwayne Steward
LGBTQ Health Advocate 
Columbus Public Health

As I continue into the second day of the LGBTI Health Research Conference at Baldwin Wallace University, it struck me as pretty powerful that the BW’s president Robert Helmer opened the first day of seminars with the words “this is the perfect time and the perfect place for this [conference].” (BW Provost, Dr. Stephen Stahl also reiterated this sentiment just after lunch with saying, “this conference is at the core of founding values.”) This stayed with me throughout the morning as we heard from such innovative speakers such as Dr. Eli Coleman who, just through all of the heralding stories he shared, showed his longstanding impact on changing the American perspective on LGBTI health research. Dr. Coleman, who is currently the director of the Program in Human Sexuality at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, also left me with a new mantra: “Without rights we will not have [good] health.”

Dr. Eli Coleman
Dr. Eli Coleman

After Dr. Coleman’s keynote address, the morning continued at a rapid-fire pace, with a revolving door of one prestigious presenter after another. Here are a few brief notes on the presentations I thought most intriguing.

  • During the “Translating Research into Policy and Heath Interventions” seminar track Kellan Baker, associate director of the LGBTI Research and Communications Project at Center for American Progress, gave a very interesting look at how political advocacy has led to inclusive research, highlighting the work of HIV/AIDS advocates during the 1980s. Baker went on to show that though there have been strides made concerning LGBTI political inclusion, there’s still so much more to be done. I found it interesting that between 2002 and 2010 there was absolutely no inclusion of LGBTI communities in any federal health research because of the change in presidential administration. This silence prompted the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association to create a sexual identity and gender identity specific companion report to the National Institutes of Health 2010 Healthy People report. Now in their 2020 Health People edition we see two LGBTI-focused reports because of such advocacy efforts.
  • Vivek Anand, Executive Director of Humsafar Trust in Mumbai, India, also took the stage during the “policy and health interventions” track and wowed myself an the audience with the grassroots, community-based research he’s been conducting in India, despite the country still criminalizing homosexuality. “On-the-ground work and community-based research is still crucial…if we are not out in the community and visible we will not be counted,” he said. Humsafar has fund-raised thousands of dollars and build several LGBT organizations in India, providing countless services and research for a nearly invisible community.
Vivek Anand
Vivek Anand

A brief break led right into a seminar track on “Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Intersex Data at Population and Clinical Levels,” which I personally found rather enthralling. I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of evidence-based research that exists regarding adding sexual orientation and gender identity to medical forms and records.

  • Joanne Keatley, briefly detailed research from the Center of Excellence for Transgender Health at University of California-San Francisco that highlighted the groundbreaking work she was involved with to make the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention start collecting transgender data in 2011. She also stressed the importance of including transgender female-to-males in HIV research, as much of their studies showed that this is an affected demographic, despite current perceptions.
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The many words for “transgender”
  • Karen Walsh, an intersex activist, detailed the importance of intersex research and how to include intersex information collection in an accurate and affirming fashion. I learned so much on the intersex community that I was not aware of, including most who are intersex receive some sort of surgical interventions as children but surgery is often medically unnecessary.
  • Dr. Jody Herman, of the Williams Institute at University of California-Los Angeles, and Harvey Makadon of Fenway Health’s National LGBT Health Education Center, also provided invaluable examples of specific language and formats that can be used on forms to capture sexual health and gender identity. If you are a healthcare provider that values inclusion I highly recommend visiting their organizations’ websites.

Stay tuned for more post-lunch recaps!

Conferences · Philly Trans health conference · Pride · Staff/Program Updates · Updates

Welcome to our new guest blogger, reporting from Philly Trans Health Conference

We are so excited to introduce Bishop S.F. Makalani-MaHee as our newest guest blogger! Bishop S.F. will be blogging from the Philadelphia Trans Health Conference, so stay tuned!

Bishop S.F. Makalani-MaHee is a Minister/Performing Artist/Community Organizer, and is also the Founder/Chair for Black Gay Pride South Florida. Bishop is currently enjoying devolving his solo show “Bustin’ Hell Wide Open” in which he explores his experiences growing up in the Pentecostal Black Church and the projects of the Bronx and coming out as same gender loving in those environments; and now living as a transgender man.  He makes his home in the South Florida area.

Follow him on twitter at www.twitter.com/TheBishopTweets

Camp Shot of SF

 

LGBT Policy

New Standards of Care for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender, and Gender Nonconforming People

by Emilia Dunham

Program Associate

Just yesterday the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) released it’s 7th Version of Standards of Care for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender, and Gender Nonconforming People (SOC) in Atlanta (where we’re proud to have several members of Fenway Health presenting at and/or in attendance).

This was last updated in 2001, and if you know anything about LGBT health and especially trans health, A LOT has changed in ten years, and this document has demonstrates the evolution in understanding of trans health. This update will make a drastic difference in how trans people are able to access their care. It’s something that will make a huge difference on a global scale for trans health, but will also directly affect individuals which is fantastic and not something we always see in trans advocacy.

If you don’t know WPATH sets the world standards of care for transgender individuals seeking gender transition. Doctor’s use these standards to determine how they will treat trans people who come into their offices, such as in terms of under what conditions they can access hormones, surgeries and other forms of transition-related care (ex. months/years in therapy and in the “real-life experiences” in the desired gender). Many trans advocates and trans individuals themselves see these as harmfully gatekeeping, but there is general understanding there should be some regulation of care for an area of health services needing more research. This document represents that balance.

You can view the document in its entirety here, which has increased significantly: http://lgbttobacco.org/files/WPATHsoc7.pdf

In the meantime here are some of the highlights:

  • Gender Conversion Psychotherapies are Unethical
  • De-psychopathologisation of Gender Difference (basically meaning that trans people aren’t inherently crazy)
  • More reasonable criteria for accessing hormones and surgeries
  • Call for health providers to be culturally competent and treat clients sensitively
  • More empowerment of trans clients in their own care
  • Removal of the three-month requirement for either “real life experience” (living in a congruent gender role) or psychotherapy before access to hormonal care.
  • Clarification on the role of the SOC as flexible clinical guidelines that may be tailored for individual needs and local cultures.
  • Inclusion of other gender nonconforming folks, minors and other new areas.
Netroots Nation

Branding and Design in Advocacy

By Hale Thompson, Guest Blogger for the Network for LGBT Health Equity at Netroots Nation 2011

Logos and tag lines–branding–are really important, underutilized communication tools in the advocacy world. Designers from the Obama 2008 campaign and the Democratic National Committee presented some key tips for creating a brand that will help move you or your organization’s advocacy work forward. Here are 5 branding guidelines from Jessica Teal who did branding for Obama’s 2008 campaign:

  1. Be serious; make branding a priority.
  2. Be authentic; find the essence of your work to craft your brand, rather than trying to please your audience.
  3. Put your brand out EVERYWHERE in all different forms and mediums and make the art work downloadable.
  4. Be consistent, coordinated and aligned (i.e. in the field vs. in the media vs. on your web site).
  5. Be nimble; branding is not a solution–it’s an evolving process.

It’s important to remember that people learn through REPETITION, which has been a recurring, ahem repetitive, theme in several workshops. Repetition and familiarity breed TRUST. Trust in turn evolves into LOYALTY.

Scholarship Opportunity

Announcing Scholarship Opportunities to the Philly Trans Health Conference!

Emilia Dunham, Program Associate

by Emilia Dunham

Program Associate

June 2nd – 4th, 2011 is the 10th anniversary of the Philadelphia Trans-Health Conference, a program of Mazzoni Center, Philadelphia’s LGBT Health Center. This year’s conference focuses on building creative community partnerships, locally, nationally, and globally. This is much in line with our goals at the Network and we’d like to help one or two of you create your own partnerships at the Conference by offering a blogging scholarship.

Workshops take place at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. To find out more about the conference visit their website for workshop and conference details: http://www.trans-health.org/

Please Note: If you are selected to attend the conference you will be asked to represent the Network for LGBT Health Equity. We will be asking scholarship recipients to write blogs on the event (about 4-7 short entries) and help promote through social media. However, we will provide instructions no matter your experience level!

Application details:

Applications are due Wednesday, May 11th, 2011 by the end of the day.

Folks from ANY background, education and skill-levels are encouraged to apply.

Applications will only be accepted by email at lgbthealthequity@gmail.com

Please ensure the subject line reads: Philly Trans Health Conference

To apply, please email BRIEF responses to the following questions:

1) Briefly describe why you want to go, and what you are hoping to get out of the conference:

2) Briefly describe what your involvement has been in tobacco control, and other health arenas.

3) Briefly describe your experience using social media, especially writing blogs, and/or with promoting news through social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

4) Briefly describe if you are from of an underserved population (transgender, person of color, low-income, etc)

5) Include where you would be coming from?

6) Do you need a Full or Partial scholarship?
(Please mark with an X if you are applying for Full Scholarship or Partial Scholarship)
If you choose partial scholarship, please mark with an X what funding categories you will be applying for.

___ Full Scholarship (Airfare, Hotel, Ground Transportation, Meals)

OR

Partial Scholarship
___ Airfare
___ Food/Per Diem
___ Ground Transportation
___ Hotel (3-4 nights)

Applications will be reviewed by staff and decisions will be made no later than May 13th. If you have questions please contact lgbthealthequity@gmail.com.

**Note Applications closed: May 11th**