Cancer · Conferences · LGBT Policy · Presentations · Steering Committee · Summit · Tobacco Policy

HealthLink E-Summit: One Day Down, One to Go!

logoCorey Prachniak serves as Chair of LGBT HealthLink’s Steering Committee and is an attorney focused on health policy, as well as a current Zuckerman Fellow at Harvard University. Corey tweets @CPrachniak.

Wow.

When the LGBT HealthLink Steering Committee decided to host an online “E-Summit” to bring together people interested in LGBT health, we didn’t know if it would work… Mostly because we made the idea up! But we wanted our committee and staff to be able to interact with the community we serve, and since we couldn’t fly everyone to HealthLink’s sunny home in Florida, we thought we’d give it a try.

Yesterday, we had over a hundred registrants for a full afternoon of sessions, featuring many members of our Steering Committee, HealthLink’s staff, and even special guest Jessica Hyde from the Texas Comprehensive Cancer Control Program. Over the course of the afternoon, we engaged in discussions on LGBT rights in healthcare, the disproportionate burden of cancer in LGBT communities, and the way that LGBT-based disparities interplay with disparities based on other aspects of people’s identities.

And it’s not over yet! Join us today (Friday) at 4:00pm Eastern for a fabulous presentation on LGBT tobacco disparities by no fewer than four members of our stellar Steering Committee and HealthLink’s Policy Manager, Juan Carlos Vega. This session, “We’re a Movement, Not a Market!,” is open to the public and is going to be an amazing way to cap off Day 2 of our events. HealthLink started as a tobacco control group, and even as we’ve grown and diversified to take on an array of LGBT health disparities, fighting tobacco remains at the heart of our mission. I’m sure the passion for positive change in our community will come across loud and clear this afternoon.

So, a big thank you to all who joined us yesterday and who will join us today. And a particularly big thank you to Jenna Wintemberg, a member of our Steering Committee and the co-chair of this event, for her many hours of hard work in putting this together. (You can even hear from Jenna at today’s tobacco session and thank her yourself!)

Oh – and if the work we’re doing is your kinda thing, you may be interested to know that we’re preparing to launch a brand-new membership program in the near future. You can sign up to learn more here.

Cancer · Conferences · LGBT Policy · Presentations · Steering Committee · Summit · Tobacco Policy

Join Us for our LGBT Health E-Summit, October 15th and 16th

 

Corey Prachniak serves as Chair of LGBT HealthLink’s Steering Committee and is an attorney focused on health policy, as well as a current Zuckerman Fellow at Harvard University. Corey tweets @CPrachniak.


For the past few months, I have been working with our fabulous steering committee and staff to put together a two day virtual conference, or “E-Summit,” on LGBT health issues. I’m excited to invite you to join us this Thursday and Friday, the 15th and 16th of October. Once you have registered for the event, you’ll be able to jump onto the webinar during any of the sessions that interest you.

On Thursday 10/15, we will kick things off at 3:00pm Eastern Time with a session on LGBT rights in healthcare, followed by a session on LGBT cancer issues at 4:00pm Eastern and finally a session on intersectionality of identities and health disparities at 5:15pm Eastern. On Friday 10/16, we will finish up with a terrific session on tobacco use in LGBT communities at 4:00pm Eastern.

You can get all the details on these presentations by downloading the program, and you can register to participate here. All of these events are open to all.

By the way – if you like the work that HealthLink is doing, and want to be involved in events like this in the future, I have good news! We are in the process of launching a free membership program that will allow individuals interested in LGBT health to partner with us in exciting ways. You can sign up to learn more here.

I hope to “see” you this Thursday and Friday!

Conferences · Tobacco Policy · Uncategorized

LGBT HealthLink Conference Commentary: Not So Straight

Jennablogphot (2)
LGBT tobacco researchers at SRNT

by Jenna Wintemberg, MPH

What: Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Conference

Where: Philadelphia, February 25 to 28, 2015

 

The Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT) conference in Philadelphia is the one I look forward the most each year, where the leading researchers in tobacco control come together to share their research. Session topics range from basic and clinical science, to behavioral and social science, to marketing and policy. I was proud to be there representing the Out, Proud and Healthy in Missouri project and LGBT HealthLink. I was also happy to share that this year I attended the conference as a travel scholarship award recipient for increasing diversity in nicotine and tobacco research. Of the 10 travel award scholars, representing many tobacco health disparate populations, I was the only LGBTQ research scholar.

Some of the LGBTQ presentations (titles and lead authors) that took place:

  • Is There a Relationship Between the Concentration of Same-Sex Couples and Tobacco Retailer Density? (Joseph Lee)
  • Rates of Tobacco Use Among Young Adult LGB Subpopulations (Amanda Richardson)
  • Minority Stress, Smoking, and Cessation Attempts: Findings From a Community Sample of Transgender Women in the San Francisco Bay Area
  • Sexual and Gender Minority Community-Based Tobacco Cessation Program: Tailored Recruitment and Evidence-Based Intervention (Jenna Wintemberg)

I always start the SRNT conference by looking through the program booklet for all of the LGBTQ tobacco presentations, but this year someone beat me too it. Joseph Lee, a graduate student at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, emailed all of the LGBTQ researchers on the first day of the conference suggesting that we have lunch together and attend each other’s sessions. We were told to look for the rainbow flag tablecloth at lunch today to find each other. We may have been only 15 out of 1,200+ researchers at the conference, but the quality of LGBTQ tobacco research being done is outstanding and we can network in a very individual and personal way. For example, during our lunch meeting we workshopped the projects we are working on such as developing cessation interventions for LGBTQ couples who both smoke, enhancing cultural competency at state quitlines and marketing these services to our communities and addressing cancer disparities. I left with great new connections, new research avenues, and a renewed passion to tackle tobacco in LGBTQ communities.

Jenna Wintemberg

Jenna Wintemberg, MPH is a Health Education and Promotion doctoral candidate at the University of Missouri and works as a Graduate Research Assistant on the Out, Proud and Healthy Project. Her research interests are Tobacco-Related Health Disparities in Minority Populations, Tobacco Cessation, and Policy Change.

 

 

State Work

For Immediate Release- LGBT HealthLink Grades States on LGBT Tobacco Integration

PRESS RELEASE
December 10,  2014

For Immediate Release
Contact:
Dr. Scout
(954) 765-6024
scout@lgbtcenters.org

LGBT HealthLink Grades States on LGBT Tobacco Integration

Ft. Lauderdale, FL – December 10, 2014 – LGBT HealthLink today announced the first ever grades for state tobacco programs’ LGBT inclusion practices. The grades, based on a survey of best practices originally conducted in 2013 and updated this fall, represent an assessment of the overall progress each state has made in addressing inclusion, including policies, training, data collection, and community engagement. Grades span from “A” to “F”, with the average across states a “C+”.

LGBT people smoke at rates that are over 50% higher than the general population and experience profound health disparities in both cancer and smoking-related disease. The survey was developed to bring transparency to how successful states are at integrating this disproportionately affected population into their overall tobacco control work.

According to Daniella Matthews-Trigg, Administrator of LGBT HealthLink, “The results of this survey not only illustrate the work that needs to be done, but highlights the impressive efforts by many states. Our hope is that creating a system for comparison will motivate states to adopt as many best practices as possible, thereby improving acceptance and wellness in LGBTQ communities around the country”. LGBT HealthLink is offering resources to each state to improve their grades.

For several years, LGBT HealthLink (formerly the Network for LGBT Health Equity) has been circulating “Identifying and Eliminating LGBT Tobacco Disparities”, a document outlining the best practices for state programs in LGBT tobacco control, and working closely with states to implement them. These report cards are intended to gauge adoption of those best practices at a state level and create a baseline for future work.

The release of the report cards comes just after the CDC’s Office of Smoking and Health recently accepted applications from states for their next five years of tobacco funding. Dr. Scout, Director of LGBT HealthLink, noted that “In order to eliminate the LGBT smoking disparity, we need to make sure the tobacco control community targets us just like the tobacco industry already does.”

Matthews-Trigg emphasized how closely HealthLink is working with states improve their grades, “We are the people providing technical assistance to these states to do this well, so this is really a report card of our work as much as theirs. We look forward to continuing our work with the many amazing state representatives to get these grades even higher.”

View the report cards: www.lgbthealthlink.org/Report-Cards/2014

For more about the methodology and scoring:

www.lgbthealthlink.org/Report-Cards

 # # #

 LGBT HealthLink, a program of CenterLink, spreads LGBT wellness best practices across state and federal health departments and community organizations. LGBT HealthLink is one of eight CDC-funded tobacco and cancer disparity networks. www.lgbthealthlink.org

CenterLink: The Community of LGBT Centers was founded in 1994 as a member-based coalition to support the development of strong, sustainable LGBT community centers. Serving over 200 LGBT community centers across the country in 46 states. Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, as well as centers in Canada, Mexico, China, Cameroon and Australia, the organization plays an important role in supporting the growth of LGBT centers and addressing the challenges they face by helping them to improve their organizational and service delivery capacity and increase access to public resources. www.lgbtcenters.org

Updates

Yet another life lost to smoking

We are deeply saddened to report that Bill Busse, a Tips From Former Smokers ad participant, has passed away. The cause of death was heart disease, which is very common for smokers. Bill shared his story on the Tips From Former Smokers Campaign about the affects that smoking had on his health (made more severe by diabetes, which he had since childhood).

The CDC released a statement from Tim McAfee, Director, CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health on the passing of Bill Busse. The CDC asks that you please direct any questions and/or condolences to TobaccoMediaCampaign@cdc.gov. The CDC will make sure that your correspondence is forwarded to Bill’s family.

Bill’s health problems didn’t stop him from heroically coming forward towarn other smokers of some of the dangers they faced if they don’t quit smoking.  Nor did his health problems stop Bill from enjoying time with his kids.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to Bill’s wife, two children and two step-children, as well as his parents and his sister.

A tip for smokers, from the man himself; “Make a list and put the people you love at the top, put down your eyes your legs your kidneys and your heart, now cross off all the things you’re okay with losing, because you’d rather smoke.”

You can view Bill Busse’s videos here.

Monthly Updates · Staff/Program Updates · Updates · webinar

Network training update- National Jewish Quitline!

HealthEquity Logo
 
     
     Network Training Update
     National Jewish Quitline

 

 

 

Last week, Dr. Scout flew to Colorado to do trainings at the National Jewish Hospital, home of one of the country’s largest quitlines.

Dr. Scout’s training, titled  “The LGBT Population and Tobacco Use: Creating an LGBT Friendly & Inclusive Environment”, discussed smoking disparities in LGBT populations, how to improve cultural competence and inclusion, data collection, and strategies for targeting LGBT communities.

Screen Shot 2014-06-23 at 9.54.52 AM

LGBT Quitline Strategies:

  • Before they call
  • Understanding access barriers
  • Enhancing welcome at your organization
  • Once they call – creating welcoming environment
  • After they call – extra materials

Evidence of LGBT Avoidance of Quitlines:

“In a rare study in Colorado that looked at intentions of smokers to use quitlines, LGBT people who smoked and wanted to quit were 5x less likely than others to call a quit line.”

The Lessons:

  • While LGBT callers are very likely to experience stressors and triggers related to LGBT status…
  • they are very unlikely to presume the quitline is a welcoming environment to discuss these issues.
  • And hiding their LGBT status can adversely affect treatment.

Screen Shot 2014-06-23 at 9.55.40 AM

Tobacco Policy

New Study Looks at Smoking Cessation among People with HIV

IMG_5241

 

Corey Prachniak is an LGBT rights, HIV policy, and healthcare attorney. He serves on the Steering Committee of the Network for LGBT Health Equity and tweets @LGBTadvocacy.

 

 

 

What makes smoking cessation successful among people living with HIV?  That was the question posed at an event last week at the American Legacy Foundation in Washington, DC.

Dr. Donna Shelley explained that ending smoking among people living with HIV is especially important because “smoking increases the risk of HIV-related infections” and leads to “poorer adherence to HIV meds, higher viral load,” and other health problems.  NAM, an HIV/AIDS organization, notes that HIV-positive “smokers are approximately three times more likely than non-smokers to develop the AIDS-defining pneumonia PCP” and that “oral thrush, a common complaint in people with HIV, is also more common amongst smokers.”  Dr. Shelley’s study focused on testing cessation strategies among people with HIV in New York.

When it comes to quitting smoking, it could be seen as a positive or negative that people living with HIV are already likely to have complicated medical adherence needs.  On the one hand, adding smoking cessation interventions and medications adds to the burden that many people living with HIV already face.  But on the other hand, many people living with HIV have found success at incorporating medication regimens into their lives and are used to managing their care, either on their own or with the support of a medical adherence team.  For people who are doing well adhering to their HIV-related medications and treatments, they may well be able to incorporate tobacco cessation measures with a high level of adherence.

In fact, that is what Dr. Shelley’s preliminary data suggested.  “Adherence at baseline to HIV meds,” meaning how well people remembered to take their HIV medications at the start of the study, “was closely correlated to adherence to cessation medications” by the study’s sixth week, she said.

Dr. Shelley also noted that the people for the study were recruited from healthcare clinics, which often are in more regular contact with their patients than are other types of medical providers.  That’s because these settings tend to offer multiple, highly coordinated services.  So, for example, if a client comes in to see her therapist but has missed an appointment with her primary care doctor, the staff person checking her in can make sure she reschedules with her doctor or gets the prescription refill or referral that she might need.

The research tested three adherence regimens: smoking cessation medication alone; medication and adherence text messages; and medication, text messages, and adherence counseling phone calls.  Interestingly, the research found that the group with the best adherence were those who received the medication and text messages, but not the phone calls, which many people reported as being “too much.”  People also stressed that they liked texts with positive reinforcement – like “stay on track” or “look how much money you’ve saved this month” – versus messages that just reminded them to take their medication.

It’s unclear whether the results are unique to people living with HIV, or would have been the same for others, as well.  But it’s worth noting that people who are already managing HIV-related care preferred quick positive reinforcement on quitting smoking rather than lengthy counseling on taking their meds or daily messages telling them to take their pill.

It’s true that HIV is not just a problem for the LGBT community.  But given that 63% of new HIV infections in 2010 were among men who have sex with men, and that LGBT people smoke at a rate that is 68% higher than the population in general, the intersection of smoking and HIV is a critical topic for LGBT health advocates to keep in mind.

Data · Puerto Rico · Resources · Steering Committee · Summit · Technical Assistance · Tobacco Policy · Updates

Benson & Hedges Targets LGBTT Communities in Puerto Rico

Juan Carlos Photo

 

Juan Carlos Vega, MLS

Blogging for the Citizens’ Alliance Pro LGBTTA Health of Puerto Rico, National Latino Alliance Pro Health Equity and the Network for LGBT Health Equity

 

 

This is bad! As health professionals, community prevention programs, and the Puerto Rico Department of Health strive to reduce tobacco use prevalence among island inhabitants, we have busted Benson & Hedges, twice, targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and transexual (LGBTT) communities in San Juan area’s LGBTT clubs. Cute girls, in tight outfits, look to scan your driver’s license in order to continue to help folks initiate or facilitate access to low price cigarettes. If you fill out the survey that they present at these bars and allow them to scan your id, you can purchase a pack of Benson & Hedges from the bar at a huge discount. No wonder LGBTT smoking prevalence is two to three times higher than that of the general population.

Health Authorities Warn: Smoking Kills
Health Authorities Warn: Smoking Kills

Twice, I have been with gay guys who are trying to quit smoking for health and financial reasons and they have been accosted by such tobacco industry tactics. One time, we bought the cigarettes, the second time we resisted. Yes, I was included. After nine years of being smoke free, I have become an occasional social smoker for the past 3-4 years. It is so nasty, the smoke inhalation, the after taste, yet, after a few drinks, I see myself taking a “hit” or two from my friends’ cigarettes. I don’t blame the industry for my personal unhealthy choices, but they sure don’t help us quit for good!  Access to cheap smokes at bars should not be allowed! 

Last weekend, was the second consecutive month, we have seen this predatory practice in our local LGBTT bars. It was contrasting to see as we were distributing promotional flyers for the  3rd LGBTT Health Summit of Puerto Rico, April 4th and 5th at the School of Nursing of the Medical Science Campus of the University of Puerto Rico, free of cost for the general public and $45.00 fee for Continuing Education for Physicians and Nurses. Against the luring of the tobacco industry to get us to smoke again, the Citizens’ Alliance Pro LGBTT Healthefforts continue to fight the dangers of tobacco use with the support ofLegacy Foundation, the Network for LGBT Health Equity, theComprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Puerto Rico, and the local tobacco free coalition. For more information, on how tobacco affects the health of LGBTT communities, come to the 3rd LGBTT Health Summit of Puerto Rico: Tendencies Towards Health EquityApril 4th and 5th in San Juan. Come by, our Summit is cheaper than the pack of cigarettes sold those nights and you will get great information, make new friends and learn how to take better care of yourselves!

spanish tobacco
Juan Carlos Vega shows a tobacco cessation material in Spanish “Tobacco is a murderer that does not discriminate”
FDA · LGBT Policy · Tobacco Policy

FDA Launches Youth Anti-Smoking Campaign, with LGBT Effort to Follow

IMG_5241

 

Corey Prachniak is an LGBT rights, HIV policy,
and healthcare attorney. 
He serves on the Steering Committee
of the Network for LGBT Health Equity
and tweets @LGBTadvocacy.

 

This morning at the National Press Club in Washington, the Food and Drug Administration unveiled a $115 million anti-smoking campaign aimed at youths – the first-ever such campaign in the FDA’s history.  Commissioner of Food and Drugs, Dr. Margaret Hamburg, explained that the effort would specifically target “on-the-cusp youth smokers,” aged 12 to 17, who either had recently begun smoking or who were open-minded to trying it.

Mitch Zeller, Director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products, noted that when compared to regular smokers, these “at risk teens are even harder to reach because they don’t even see themselves as smokers.”  Instead, they believe that they are only casual users who will not get hooked.

I had the opportunity to ask the panel about their plan to prevent smoking among LGBT youths.  Much as Director Zeller noted that at risk youths don’t consider themselves smokers, many youths might not consider themselves LGBT, and are instead are still processing how they feel or working on coming out.

Responding to my question, the Center’s Director of the Office of Health Communication and Education, Kathy Crosby, said, “We understand that there are sensitivities and we understand that there are cultural issues, as well,” in reaching LGBT teens.  Crosby noted that while the campaign on the whole targeted youths aged 12 to 17, they will launch a subsequent LGBT campaign that may instead focus on 17 to 18-year-olds who are more likely to identify as LGBT.  The hope is that by targeting that subgroup, the message will trickle down to younger teens who are entering the LGBT community.

Ms. Crosby noted that this LGBT sub-campaign is still in the initial stages of development, and will likely take one to two years to take off.  Director Zeller added that the LGBT effort will have “similar themes” to the broader campaign being launched this month, but will be “more targeted” to LGBT youths.100_4885

Directing anti-smoking efforts at LGBT youths is necessary given that the LGBT community has long been a target of tobacco corporations – and has disproportionately high rates of tobacco use to show for it. According to research recently compiled by the Network, LGBT people smoke at a rate that is 68% higher than the population as a whole.  Although the LGBT community spends $7.9 billion – with a “b” – on tobacco products each year, crucial Surgeon General reports on smoking did not even mention LGBT people until a 2001 document entitled “Women and Smoking.”

The new FDA campaign, entitled “The Real Cost,” will “highlight the real costs and health consequences of tobacco use” by focusing on things that young people care about, such as outward appearance and having control over their lives, said Commissioner Hamburg.  The FDA’s research – which will continue for two years as they track 8,000 teens exposed to the ad campaign – revealed that these concerns are more relevant to young people than are long-term consequences, such as heart and lung health, that seem too distant to be real threats.

“It’s different than what we’ve heard before,” said youth activist Daniel Giuffra, “and I think teens will respond to this.”  By using social media in addition to traditional media buys, Mr. Giuffra believes the campaign will “get a conversation started, something we haven’t been able to do before.”

It is a conversation that the LGBT community – and their advocates – desperately need to have.

100_4883

Conferences · social media · Summit · Tobacco Policy · Uncategorized · White House

We’re working toward a tobacco-free future for LGBT communities!

Here at the National LGBT Cancer Network Summit in NYC, we wanted to get in on the Surgeon General Report excitement! #SGR50photo

image 7

image 5image 2image 3image 4image 6imageimage 9image 8