State Work

For Immediate Release- LGBT HealthLink Grades States on LGBT Tobacco Integration

PRESS RELEASE
December 10,  2014

For Immediate Release
Contact:
Dr. Scout
(954) 765-6024
scout@lgbtcenters.org

LGBT HealthLink Grades States on LGBT Tobacco Integration

Ft. Lauderdale, FL – December 10, 2014 – LGBT HealthLink today announced the first ever grades for state tobacco programs’ LGBT inclusion practices. The grades, based on a survey of best practices originally conducted in 2013 and updated this fall, represent an assessment of the overall progress each state has made in addressing inclusion, including policies, training, data collection, and community engagement. Grades span from “A” to “F”, with the average across states a “C+”.

LGBT people smoke at rates that are over 50% higher than the general population and experience profound health disparities in both cancer and smoking-related disease. The survey was developed to bring transparency to how successful states are at integrating this disproportionately affected population into their overall tobacco control work.

According to Daniella Matthews-Trigg, Administrator of LGBT HealthLink, “The results of this survey not only illustrate the work that needs to be done, but highlights the impressive efforts by many states. Our hope is that creating a system for comparison will motivate states to adopt as many best practices as possible, thereby improving acceptance and wellness in LGBTQ communities around the country”. LGBT HealthLink is offering resources to each state to improve their grades.

For several years, LGBT HealthLink (formerly the Network for LGBT Health Equity) has been circulating “Identifying and Eliminating LGBT Tobacco Disparities”, a document outlining the best practices for state programs in LGBT tobacco control, and working closely with states to implement them. These report cards are intended to gauge adoption of those best practices at a state level and create a baseline for future work.

The release of the report cards comes just after the CDC’s Office of Smoking and Health recently accepted applications from states for their next five years of tobacco funding. Dr. Scout, Director of LGBT HealthLink, noted that “In order to eliminate the LGBT smoking disparity, we need to make sure the tobacco control community targets us just like the tobacco industry already does.”

Matthews-Trigg emphasized how closely HealthLink is working with states improve their grades, “We are the people providing technical assistance to these states to do this well, so this is really a report card of our work as much as theirs. We look forward to continuing our work with the many amazing state representatives to get these grades even higher.”

View the report cards: www.lgbthealthlink.org/Report-Cards/2014

For more about the methodology and scoring:

www.lgbthealthlink.org/Report-Cards

 # # #

 LGBT HealthLink, a program of CenterLink, spreads LGBT wellness best practices across state and federal health departments and community organizations. LGBT HealthLink is one of eight CDC-funded tobacco and cancer disparity networks. www.lgbthealthlink.org

CenterLink: The Community of LGBT Centers was founded in 1994 as a member-based coalition to support the development of strong, sustainable LGBT community centers. Serving over 200 LGBT community centers across the country in 46 states. Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, as well as centers in Canada, Mexico, China, Cameroon and Australia, the organization plays an important role in supporting the growth of LGBT centers and addressing the challenges they face by helping them to improve their organizational and service delivery capacity and increase access to public resources. www.lgbtcenters.org

Uncategorized

CDC’s #20Million Memorial

#20Million Memorial

#20Millionbanner

Just a mere fifty years ago, the U.S. Surgeon General released its first report on smoking and health. It’s sad to report that since then, there have been an estimated 20 million deaths in the United States, all from smoking and/or exposure to secondhand smoke. To put 20 million into perspective, there are only 2 states that have more than 20 million residents, and that would be California and Texas.

smoking infograph

This addiction not only claimed 20 million lives, but it left husbands and wives, mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, and friends heartbroken and sometimes alone. To visually get their point across, the CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) launched an online memorial, this will commemorate the loss of the 20 million people, who have lost their lives to smoking related diseases.

The campaign began October 7th. People all across the country are taking to social media to share their testimony of people whom they lost and how it has affected their families. You can also be a part of this heartfelt memorial.

How do you get involved you asked? Start by sharing a memorial—a message and/or a photo—of someone you know who has lost their life to a smoking-related disease. By posting your memorial on social media with the hashtag #20million, your submission will become a part of CDC’s #20Million Memorial.

Below are examples you can use when drafting your own memorial(s).\

Twitter:

#20milltwitter

Instagram:

#20millinsta

Spread the Word

If you don’t know anyone who has died from smoking, you can still get involved by promoting the #20Million Memorial campaign as well. Listed below are sample social media messages for you to post on your organization’s social media platforms or on your social media sites:

  • Today marks the kickoff of CDC’s #20Million Memorial. Since the 1964 Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health, 20 million people have died from a smoking-related illness. Share a memorial of someone you lost with the hashtag #20million.
  • Together with @CDCTobaccoFree, we honor the #20million we have lost due to smoking. Share a memorial post of someone you lost using the hashtag #20million.
  • Join @CDCTobaccoFree to raise awareness about the #20million people who have died because of smoking. www.cdc.gov/tips
  • Who in your life has been affected by a smoking-related illness? Share your story using the #20million hashtag. www.cdc.gov/tips

We hope that you will join us all in memorializing our loved ones, and potentially changing the lives of people who battle with tobacco use. If you have any questions, please contact Maggie Silver at uvt8@cdc.gov or Jackie Woodring at ime9@cdc.gov.

Updates

Yet another life lost to smoking

We are deeply saddened to report that Bill Busse, a Tips From Former Smokers ad participant, has passed away. The cause of death was heart disease, which is very common for smokers. Bill shared his story on the Tips From Former Smokers Campaign about the affects that smoking had on his health (made more severe by diabetes, which he had since childhood).

The CDC released a statement from Tim McAfee, Director, CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health on the passing of Bill Busse. The CDC asks that you please direct any questions and/or condolences to TobaccoMediaCampaign@cdc.gov. The CDC will make sure that your correspondence is forwarded to Bill’s family.

Bill’s health problems didn’t stop him from heroically coming forward towarn other smokers of some of the dangers they faced if they don’t quit smoking.  Nor did his health problems stop Bill from enjoying time with his kids.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to Bill’s wife, two children and two step-children, as well as his parents and his sister.

A tip for smokers, from the man himself; “Make a list and put the people you love at the top, put down your eyes your legs your kidneys and your heart, now cross off all the things you’re okay with losing, because you’d rather smoke.”

You can view Bill Busse’s videos here.

Pride · social media · Tobacco Policy · Uncategorized

New Tips From Former Smokers Ad Features Effects of Tobacco & HIV

BioPic b&w

     Felecia King

    Project Specialist

   The Network for LGBT Health Equity

 
 

This week, the CDC launched the next phase of the Tips From Former Smokers Campaign, and this time they are tackling the issue of tobacco and HIV. The ad features Brian, who smoked for 30 years, and suffered a stroke as a complication of his HIV and tobacco use. (read more about Brian’s story HERE)

Smoking is especially harmful to people who are living with HIV. For example, smokers with HIV:

  • Are at higher risk than non-smokers with HIV of developing lung cancer, head and neck cancers, cervical and anal cancers, and other cancers;
  • Are more likely than non-smokers with HIV to develop bacterial pneumonia, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP), COPD, and heart disease;
  • Are more likely than non-smokers with HIV to develop two conditions that affect the mouth: oral candidiasis (thrush) and oral hairy leukoplakia; and
  • Have a poorer response to antiretroviral therapy.
  • People with HIV who smoke are also less likely to keep to their HIV treatment plan and have a greater likelihood of developing an AIDS-defining condition and dying earlier than non-smokers with HIV.

(the above examples are from Aids.gov <– Click the link for more info!)

For these reasons, smoking is a significant health issue for all individuals, but it is even more of a concern for people living with HIV, who tend to smoke more than the general population. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 19% of adults in the United States are smokers. However, the smoking rate is two to three times higher among adults who are HIV-positive.

 

SmokingLGBT    

Cross-posting · Quit Tips

CDC SEEKING EX-SMOKERS TO BE IN FUTURE TIPS CAMPAIGN ADS- SPREAD THE WORD!

 
HealthEquity Logo
 
 
 
CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health seeks ex-smokers
to be in Tips From Former Smokers campaign!
 
 
 
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Office on Smoking and Health are recruiting additional candidates to be considered for an upcoming national education campaign, Tips From Former Smokers (Tips). This campaign is similar to previous campaigns seen here, real people who have had life-changing, smoking-related health problems will be featured. They are conducting a national search to find people with compelling stories who are willing to participate in their campaign.

The CDC and OSH are seeking people from all backgrounds, and are particularly looking for candidates who are of Asian descent. All applicants must be tobacco-free for at least 6 months.

They are looking for ex-smokers who:

·         Have or have had colorectal cancer that was linked to cigarette smoking (ages 30–65).
·         Have or have had macular degeneration that was linked to cigarette smoking (ages 40–65).
·         Used cigars with cigarettes or used cigarillos or little cigars with or without cigarettes, thinking cigars, cigarillos and little cigars were healthier than cigarettes and developed a serious health condition while smoking (ages 20-60).
·         Used e-cigarettes or smokeless tobacco for at least a year while continuing to smoke some cigarettes; and
·         Thought using e-cigarettes or smokeless tobacco to cut back on some cigarettes would be good for your health; and
·         Despite cutting back, you were later diagnosed with a serious health condition.
All individuals should be comfortable sharing their story publicly and be able to articulate how their smoking-related condition has changed their life. The association between smoking and their condition must be clear, and candidates’ physicians will be contacted to verify that smoking contributed to the condition.

The CDC and OSH would like for you to help distribute this flyer (below). Please feel free to email it to anyone who might be willing to help CDC recruit for this campaign. The flyer can be posted in public areas or shared with anyone who may know people who fit the criteria above.

Feel free to print and share! click to enlarge
Feel free to print and share! click to enlarge
If you have questions, please send them to the CDC representative, Crystal Bruce, jgx6@cdc.gov.
Please put “Recruitment Question” in the subject line.
Data · Puerto Rico · Resources · Steering Committee · Summit · Technical Assistance · Tobacco Policy · Updates

Benson & Hedges Targets LGBTT Communities in Puerto Rico

Juan Carlos Photo

 

Juan Carlos Vega, MLS

Blogging for the Citizens’ Alliance Pro LGBTTA Health of Puerto Rico, National Latino Alliance Pro Health Equity and the Network for LGBT Health Equity

 

 

This is bad! As health professionals, community prevention programs, and the Puerto Rico Department of Health strive to reduce tobacco use prevalence among island inhabitants, we have busted Benson & Hedges, twice, targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and transexual (LGBTT) communities in San Juan area’s LGBTT clubs. Cute girls, in tight outfits, look to scan your driver’s license in order to continue to help folks initiate or facilitate access to low price cigarettes. If you fill out the survey that they present at these bars and allow them to scan your id, you can purchase a pack of Benson & Hedges from the bar at a huge discount. No wonder LGBTT smoking prevalence is two to three times higher than that of the general population.

Health Authorities Warn: Smoking Kills
Health Authorities Warn: Smoking Kills

Twice, I have been with gay guys who are trying to quit smoking for health and financial reasons and they have been accosted by such tobacco industry tactics. One time, we bought the cigarettes, the second time we resisted. Yes, I was included. After nine years of being smoke free, I have become an occasional social smoker for the past 3-4 years. It is so nasty, the smoke inhalation, the after taste, yet, after a few drinks, I see myself taking a “hit” or two from my friends’ cigarettes. I don’t blame the industry for my personal unhealthy choices, but they sure don’t help us quit for good!  Access to cheap smokes at bars should not be allowed! 

Last weekend, was the second consecutive month, we have seen this predatory practice in our local LGBTT bars. It was contrasting to see as we were distributing promotional flyers for the  3rd LGBTT Health Summit of Puerto Rico, April 4th and 5th at the School of Nursing of the Medical Science Campus of the University of Puerto Rico, free of cost for the general public and $45.00 fee for Continuing Education for Physicians and Nurses. Against the luring of the tobacco industry to get us to smoke again, the Citizens’ Alliance Pro LGBTT Healthefforts continue to fight the dangers of tobacco use with the support ofLegacy Foundation, the Network for LGBT Health Equity, theComprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Puerto Rico, and the local tobacco free coalition. For more information, on how tobacco affects the health of LGBTT communities, come to the 3rd LGBTT Health Summit of Puerto Rico: Tendencies Towards Health EquityApril 4th and 5th in San Juan. Come by, our Summit is cheaper than the pack of cigarettes sold those nights and you will get great information, make new friends and learn how to take better care of yourselves!

spanish tobacco
Juan Carlos Vega shows a tobacco cessation material in Spanish “Tobacco is a murderer that does not discriminate”
Uncategorized

E-Cigarettes: Friend or Foe for the LGBT Communities?


E-Cigs

 As published on Huffington Post’s new LGBT Wellness blog, see original at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scout-phd/e-cigarettes-friend-or-foe_b_5024583.html

Working in tobacco control sometimes elicits interesting reactions from people. Some try to hide their smoking. While I certainly appreciate not being near the smoke itself, I’ve got great empathy for smokers. In fact, since most smokers have already tried to quit, they’re much more likely to be fellow fighters against tobacco than non-smokers. Sometimes they ask me how to best quit and I’m happy to tell them (hint, call 1-800-QUITNOW). These days everyone’s asking me something new: What about e-cigarettes? The shortest answer is “they could be helpful for a few, but we all worry about our youth.”

First, if you’re not familiar with e-cigs, they are battery-powered imitators of old-school cigarettes, designed to deliver nicotine, flavor and other chemicals through vapor inhaled by the user. Most of them have a swag little electronic light at the tip to make it seem more like an old-school cig. Some now have other names like e-hookah to avoid any cigarette associations. The claim is here’s a no-combustion device to get your nicotine fix, great for cessation and great to smoke in places where cigarettes are banned.

There is one study supporting the effects of e-cigs in helping people quit smoking but now another study is out contravening it. Considering how toxic cigarette smoke is, we all applaud anything that helps reduce the amount of cigarette smoke in the air. But if you’re trying to use e-cigs as a cessation device it’s a bit dicey right now because they’re unregulated, so the amount of nicotine you get in each dose varies, and sometimes does not match the advertising. It’s commonly known that it only takes about two weeks to kick the nicotine addiction of smoking, but anyone who’s quit will tell you, it’s the social habit of smoking that draws you back again and again. I’m not sure how putting a cigarette replacement in your mouth helps you kick that social habit — sounds to me like it’s just perpetuating it. Plus there is a new study showing other toxic chemicals in the vapor. To top it off, there’s no real science on the long-term effects of inhaling nicotine vapor. So while I’m willing to bet it’s better than inhaling tobacco smoke, that’s like saying I bet it’s better than inhaling truck exhaust. Nicotine is so toxic, poison control centers just issued an alert about high numbers of calls on accidental exposure. Just touching the liquid is enough to cause vomiting and ingesting as little as a teaspoon of some of the liquid nicotine concentrations can be fatal. I hope people set a higher bar for their own cessation journey.

The real problem is, as anyone who’s visited a vaporium can see, it’s not a cessation game. Vaporiums and e-cigs are all about enticing, and particularly enticing young people. Wander into your local vaporium belly up to the “bar” and you’ll be shocked to see how many vaporiums look like the lovechild of a hip coffee shop and a candy store. I’m not sure exactly which adult Marlboro user would switch to cotton candy flavored nicotine cartridges, or banana nut bread, or cherry limeade. Sounds to me more like flavors I’d find at a little league game. To make it worse, these products are easily available online and many states aren’t yet doing anything to restrict access to minors. Data show LGBT youth continue to smoke at rates much higher than their non-LGBT counterparts and the number of youth experimenting with e-cigs is rising rapidly… the very last thing we need is to have some fancy new gadgetry on the market enticing LGBT youth to start using a highly addictive drug to deal with the stress of stigma against us all.

We pass on smoking down through the LGBT generations socially. I’ve always called it an STD for us, a socially transmitted disease. So I also worry about adult e-cig use. Every time you “light up” you’re perpetuating the huge LGBT cigarette culture, all of us laughing and having fun and hanging out, with cigarettes in our mouths.

We already have cessation aids that deliver you nicotine in controlled regulated doses, you can find those on every drugstore shelf. Nicely, there’s not one gummy bear or watermelon flavored nicotine patch, spray or gum. So while e-cigs might help a few in quitting, I say the big picture on e-cigs for the LGBT communities is we need to think of our youth and “beware of the wolf in sheep’s clothing.”

_____

self-portrait-scout

 

 

 Dr. Scout, Director

 The Network for LGBT Health Equity

 

 

Follow Scout, Ph.D. on Twitter: www.twitter.com/scoutout

Presentations · Staff/Program Updates · Updates · webinar

Join Me For a Live Webcast: The Passion and Power of Young People in the Ongoing Fight Against Tobacco

Kenneth E. Warner | Lecture Series

The Passion and Power of Young People in the Ongoing Fight Against Tobacco

SAVE THE DATE:

Wednesday July 24, 2013 from 12:30 PM to 2:00 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

 CLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILS AND TO VISIT THE EVENT HOMEPAGE

 

In-person attendance is limited to those attending the CTFK Youth Advocacy Symposium and Legacy Youth Leadership Institute Training. No registration is necessary to view the live webcast.

 

On Wednesday, July 24th, Legacy and the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids (CTFK) will host a special youth-led panel discussion, as part of the Kenneth E. Warner Series Lecture, which will highlight the power and passion of youth engagement in tobacco control.

Young leaders will discuss the challenges and successes of the movement and, with the upcoming release of the 50th Anniversary of the Surgeon General’s report, its significance in the future of tobacco control for years to come.

The live webcast will be archived for your convenience.

Moderator: Ritney Castine, Associate Director of Youth Advocacy, CTFK (Former Legacy Youth Board Liaison)

Panelists:

  • Chad Bullock, Founding Director of Forget Tobacco
  • Kaitlyn Reilly, Communications Consultant for Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Anna Santayana, Grassroots Marketing Coordinator for Legacy (Former crew marketer for the truth®tour)
  • Lee Storrow, Managing Director of the NC Alliance for Health and Member of the City Council for North Carolina Chapel Hill (Former Legacy Youth Board Liaison)

& Yours Truly…. 

  • Gustavo Torrez, Program Manager for the Network for LGBT Health Equity

 

For more information, please contact Laura Cruzada at lcruzada@legacyforhealth.org or 202-341-0324.

Resources · social media · Tobacco Policy

Upcoming webinar about CDC’s unveiling of “Talk with your doctor” sub-campaign- register today!

New Network Logo Symbol 3-2011
 
 
The Network for LGBT Health Equity 
Bringing you awesome Webinars and keeping you in the know! 
 
 
 
 
 

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A new feature of the CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign was unveiled this week— “Talk With Your Doctor” (TWYD). The goal of this phase of the campaign is to engage health care providers and encourage them to use Tips as an opportunity to start a dialogue with their patients who smoke about quitting. It is also meant to serve as a reminder for smokers to talk with their healthcare providers about effective methods to help them quit.

As you may remember from our press release about the Tips campaign, “One of the ‘Tips from Former Smokers’ ads features a lesbian who suffers from asthma triggered by working in a smoke filled bar. Recently released data from the CDC shows that LGBT people smoke cigarettes at rates that are nearly 70% higher than the general population.” This new phase of the campaign is yet another amazing way to reach out to our communities about this huge disparity!

On Thursday, June 13th, The Network will be teaming up with the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA) and CenterLink to bring you a webinar discussing the “Talk With Your Doctor” campaign, and the impact that it will have on the health of LGBT communities.

Join us at 2pm EST by registering HERE!

TTYD Campaign Webinar Flyer

Uncategorized

LGBT folks share their quit tips

New Network Logo Symbol 3-2011

 

 
Network for LGBT Health Equity
Celebrating Spring with some fierce quit tips! 

 

 

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The Network for LGBT Health Equity is one of six national Networks working to reduce tobacco-related disparities in priority populations.

APPEAL, Break Free Alliance, NAATPN, NLTCNKeep it Sacred and (yours truly) the Network for LGBT Health Equity, represent populations that have higher rates of tobacco use and tobacco related illness. Under the umbrella of the Center for Disease Control,  these Networks identify, explain, address, and reduce these disparities.

With the recent roll-out of the second phase of the CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers Campaign, the National Networks wanted to highlight tips from members of our communities who have quit as well!

Seven fabulous LGBT people volunteered their stories and tips for quitting! You can see them all on the National Network’s site!

Here’s a sneak peek at some of the tips. Click on the name to read their whole story:

Anya (200x142)

 

“Set achievable goals for yourself and reward yourself when you reach them. Make it a positive experience for yourself!”

Anya

 

Erin (200x142)

 

“Find a quitting buddy– if there are two or more of you trying to quit, then you can motivate each other.”

Erin

 

Jessica (200x142)

“I publicly announced that I quit smoking (on Facebook), so that I would have to be held accountable.”

Jessica

 

 

Martini (200x142)

“A medical professional told me it was not a matter of “if”, but “when” I would get emphysema. I chose a quit date and ended my addiction soon after.”

Martini

 

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“Reach out for support — I found it helpful to share in my journey on Facebook and use the positive feedback of friends and family for encouragement and motivation to keep going.”

Sherrill

“Know you are worth the effort and can achieve freedom from the tobacco dependence.” – Stuart

Tiffany (200x142)

 

“I had to accept that I could never be a social smoker again.”

Tiffany