Resources · social media · Tobacco Policy

Upcoming webinar about CDC’s unveiling of “Talk with your doctor” sub-campaign- register today!

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The Network for LGBT Health Equity 
Bringing you awesome Webinars and keeping you in the know! 
 
 
 
 
 

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A new feature of the CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign was unveiled this week— “Talk With Your Doctor” (TWYD). The goal of this phase of the campaign is to engage health care providers and encourage them to use Tips as an opportunity to start a dialogue with their patients who smoke about quitting. It is also meant to serve as a reminder for smokers to talk with their healthcare providers about effective methods to help them quit.

As you may remember from our press release about the Tips campaign, “One of the ‘Tips from Former Smokers’ ads features a lesbian who suffers from asthma triggered by working in a smoke filled bar. Recently released data from the CDC shows that LGBT people smoke cigarettes at rates that are nearly 70% higher than the general population.” This new phase of the campaign is yet another amazing way to reach out to our communities about this huge disparity!

On Thursday, June 13th, The Network will be teaming up with the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA) and CenterLink to bring you a webinar discussing the “Talk With Your Doctor” campaign, and the impact that it will have on the health of LGBT communities.

Join us at 2pm EST by registering HERE!

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LGBT folks share their quit tips

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Network for LGBT Health Equity
Celebrating Spring with some fierce quit tips! 

 

 

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The Network for LGBT Health Equity is one of six national Networks working to reduce tobacco-related disparities in priority populations.

APPEAL, Break Free Alliance, NAATPN, NLTCNKeep it Sacred and (yours truly) the Network for LGBT Health Equity, represent populations that have higher rates of tobacco use and tobacco related illness. Under the umbrella of the Center for Disease Control,  these Networks identify, explain, address, and reduce these disparities.

With the recent roll-out of the second phase of the CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers Campaign, the National Networks wanted to highlight tips from members of our communities who have quit as well!

Seven fabulous LGBT people volunteered their stories and tips for quitting! You can see them all on the National Network’s site!

Here’s a sneak peek at some of the tips. Click on the name to read their whole story:

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“Set achievable goals for yourself and reward yourself when you reach them. Make it a positive experience for yourself!”

Anya

 

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“Find a quitting buddy– if there are two or more of you trying to quit, then you can motivate each other.”

Erin

 

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“I publicly announced that I quit smoking (on Facebook), so that I would have to be held accountable.”

Jessica

 

 

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“A medical professional told me it was not a matter of “if”, but “when” I would get emphysema. I chose a quit date and ended my addiction soon after.”

Martini

 

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“Reach out for support — I found it helpful to share in my journey on Facebook and use the positive feedback of friends and family for encouragement and motivation to keep going.”

Sherrill

“Know you are worth the effort and can achieve freedom from the tobacco dependence.” – Stuart

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“I had to accept that I could never be a social smoker again.”

Tiffany

Conferences · SRNT · Tobacco Policy

“My Name is Sherrill and I’m a Recovering Smoker”

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Sherrill Wayland, MSW
SAGE
Metro St. Louis
 
 
 
 

“My Name is Sherrill and I’m a Recovering Smoker”

This was my opening comment for the “Voices of Community Partners” Panel, during the Community Engagement to Address Tobacco-related Health Disparities Pre-Conference at SRNT.  If you had told me a year ago that I would be asked to speak on a panel regarding smoking cessation programs, I would have laughed out loud. As a year ago, I was smoking a pack a day and on a really bad day maybe two. Fast forward a year and March 26th marks my one year anniversary of being tobacco free thanks to the Missouri Out, Proud and Healthy Project and the SAGE Metro St. Louis Smoking Cessation program.

Many of the health disparities prevalent in minority communities can be directly linked to smoking. Represented in the host of speakers during the pre-conference were institutional researchers and community partners working with minority communities including Native American, African American, East Asian Youth, HIV and LGBT communities. The common theme heard over and over was the importance of building collaborative relationships between research institutions and community based organizations based on trust and open communication. The community partners have a unique position to bring cultural understanding to the forefront of health disparities work. The research institutions bring invaluable resources through grant funds, technical assistance and capacity building. These collaborations empower community based organizations to deliver critical services to minority communities for addressing health disparities which would often not be possible without the support of research institutions.

 
SAGE Metro St. Louis is grateful for the work of the Out, Proud and Healthy Project from the University of Missouri – Columbia for the work they are doing to address health disparities within the LGBT community. Through building partnerships such as these, we can leverage our resources, conduct cutting edge research and most importantly, deliver services to the LGBT community designed to decrease health disparities which have historically been overlooked.

 
In closing, I encourage community based organizations to reach out in your communities to your research institutions and offer your support and partnership for the important work of community based research. It just might save a life!