Updates

Yet another life lost to smoking

We are deeply saddened to report that Bill Busse, a Tips From Former Smokers ad participant, has passed away. The cause of death was heart disease, which is very common for smokers. Bill shared his story on the Tips From Former Smokers Campaign about the affects that smoking had on his health (made more severe by diabetes, which he had since childhood).

The CDC released a statement from Tim McAfee, Director, CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health on the passing of Bill Busse. The CDC asks that you please direct any questions and/or condolences to TobaccoMediaCampaign@cdc.gov. The CDC will make sure that your correspondence is forwarded to Bill’s family.

Bill’s health problems didn’t stop him from heroically coming forward towarn other smokers of some of the dangers they faced if they don’t quit smoking.  Nor did his health problems stop Bill from enjoying time with his kids.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to Bill’s wife, two children and two step-children, as well as his parents and his sister.

A tip for smokers, from the man himself; “Make a list and put the people you love at the top, put down your eyes your legs your kidneys and your heart, now cross off all the things you’re okay with losing, because you’d rather smoke.”

You can view Bill Busse’s videos here.

Monthly Updates · Staff/Program Updates · Updates · webinar

Network training update- National Jewish Quitline!

HealthEquity Logo
 
     
     Network Training Update
     National Jewish Quitline

 

 

 

Last week, Dr. Scout flew to Colorado to do trainings at the National Jewish Hospital, home of one of the country’s largest quitlines.

Dr. Scout’s training, titled  “The LGBT Population and Tobacco Use: Creating an LGBT Friendly & Inclusive Environment”, discussed smoking disparities in LGBT populations, how to improve cultural competence and inclusion, data collection, and strategies for targeting LGBT communities.

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LGBT Quitline Strategies:

  • Before they call
  • Understanding access barriers
  • Enhancing welcome at your organization
  • Once they call – creating welcoming environment
  • After they call – extra materials

Evidence of LGBT Avoidance of Quitlines:

“In a rare study in Colorado that looked at intentions of smokers to use quitlines, LGBT people who smoked and wanted to quit were 5x less likely than others to call a quit line.”

The Lessons:

  • While LGBT callers are very likely to experience stressors and triggers related to LGBT status…
  • they are very unlikely to presume the quitline is a welcoming environment to discuss these issues.
  • And hiding their LGBT status can adversely affect treatment.

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Uncategorized

LGBT folks share their quit tips

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Network for LGBT Health Equity
Celebrating Spring with some fierce quit tips! 

 

 

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The Network for LGBT Health Equity is one of six national Networks working to reduce tobacco-related disparities in priority populations.

APPEAL, Break Free Alliance, NAATPN, NLTCNKeep it Sacred and (yours truly) the Network for LGBT Health Equity, represent populations that have higher rates of tobacco use and tobacco related illness. Under the umbrella of the Center for Disease Control,  these Networks identify, explain, address, and reduce these disparities.

With the recent roll-out of the second phase of the CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers Campaign, the National Networks wanted to highlight tips from members of our communities who have quit as well!

Seven fabulous LGBT people volunteered their stories and tips for quitting! You can see them all on the National Network’s site!

Here’s a sneak peek at some of the tips. Click on the name to read their whole story:

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“Set achievable goals for yourself and reward yourself when you reach them. Make it a positive experience for yourself!”

Anya

 

Erin (200x142)

 

“Find a quitting buddy– if there are two or more of you trying to quit, then you can motivate each other.”

Erin

 

Jessica (200x142)

“I publicly announced that I quit smoking (on Facebook), so that I would have to be held accountable.”

Jessica

 

 

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“A medical professional told me it was not a matter of “if”, but “when” I would get emphysema. I chose a quit date and ended my addiction soon after.”

Martini

 

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“Reach out for support — I found it helpful to share in my journey on Facebook and use the positive feedback of friends and family for encouragement and motivation to keep going.”

Sherrill

“Know you are worth the effort and can achieve freedom from the tobacco dependence.” – Stuart

Tiffany (200x142)

 

“I had to accept that I could never be a social smoker again.”

Tiffany