Netroots Nation

LGBT STRATEGY SESSION

by Hale Thompson, Guest Blogger at Netroots Nation 2011

After listening to Dan Pfeiffer, President Obama’s Communication Director, defend the President’s leadership on LGBT issues, I wondered how the LGBT strategy session would play out. Of course, I find strategy and LGBT issues compelling in their own rights, but I have to wonder how we move forward on issues at the federal level. And while I expected more conflict and even some drama in the strategy session, the format helped to prevent sparks from flying. Here’s the agenda:

Review the strengths, weaknesses of current strategies and develop a new one(s) for the following goals:

  1. DADT
  2. ENDA
  3. DOMA repeal
  4. UAFA

Sounds simple enough, right? We also had to choose a perspective from which to discuss the strategies we have employed on these issues: 1) “insider” advocate, 2) “outsider” advocate, and 3) blogger. Given that I have only actively worked on ENDA, I sat at an “outsider” advocacy table. Here’s some of the takeaways:

  1. As a movement, we might be better served by focusing on more “bottom-up” strategies like how to build stronger coalitions across issues (e.g., the Dream Act and EFCA are QUEER issues, and ENDA is not simply a trans issue), rather then “top-down” strategies like focusing on which politicians *might* support us on the most politically expedient of our issues.
  2. We need to do more education within our own community; racism, xenophobia, transphobia and classism within our own communities make bottom-up strategies challenging if not exasperating.
  3. LGBT media outlets need to step up and produce more positive representations of transgender stories and lives. Check out Original Plumbing or New England GLAD’s Everyone Matters on Youtube, for two very different but important examples. For tips on how to produce effective media representations, see my post from yesterday, Lessons from Hollywood.
OK, GO!
Tobacco Policy · webinar

Snus Follow-up: What you can do to Prevent Tobacco Ads in LGBT Media!

Staff in Puerto Rico: Gustavo, Emilia & Scout
Network Staff

Network staff

Reporting on the Network Snus countermarketing response

Last January Steering Committee member Joseph Lee of UNC posted to the Networks discussion Listserv about a recent article placed in the Winston-Salem Journal titled: Reynolds targets quitters.

This article outlines the R.J. Reynolds (RJR) national marketing campaign of Camel SNUS as a potential New Year’s Resolution solution for smokers.  The article author interviewed David Howard, a Reynolds spokesman who said “It is the company’s first campaign aimed specifically at encouraging smokers to switch to Camel SNUS.”  Howard later says “A lot of adults make a decision to quit smoking this time of year, for those making that attempt, but wanting [sic] the pleasure of tobacco we’re saying ‘here’s and [sic] option.’”

Joseph’s post sparked a very lively discussion on the listserv and we found that many LGBT publications across the country started running the RJ Reynolds Camel SNUS ads. When you look at the ads you will notice Camel launched the Pleasure to Switch Challenge.

Due to the high volume of discussion, the Network convened a call to discuss this issue and plan next steps for communities to take action.

Here are some suggestions the group developed for your work:

1) Submit op-ed pieces, or letters to the editors sharing your options of the recent influx of tobacco advertising in your local publications.

2) Launch a campaign urging your local publications to not accept Tobacco Industry Advertising/funds.

  • Click here for a comprehensive resolution from MySCENEcity.com which built off of the great work that came out of California.
  • Currently, Bob Gordon, Project Director for the California LGBT Tobacco Education Partnership currently has a list and we know of five active LGBT publications that have a policy to refuse tobacco ads: Bay Area Reporter, San Francisco Bay Times, Curve Magazine, Outword (Sacramento), and MySCENEcity.com.
  • We know there are more, and Bob has offered to keep a list of publications on their site, http://www.lastdrag.org/cleanmoney.html. Email him if you currently know of any publications that refuse tobacco ads, and when you get publications to sign on email us and we will be sure to publicize it widely. This project has and continues to do some amazing work.

3) Raise awareness of the tobacco industry efforts and launch counter marketing campaigns.

Jamie Delavan has actively worked on this issue and is starting to see some

Project Filter's Countermarketing Poster

great success. Jamie’s shop created and placed counter ads in the Boise Weekly, the local publication that had published the SNUS ad, which met very positive response from the agency. Click here to view their Ads.

4) Share your activities with us and with others, or ask for advise!

  • These are just a few examples of what groups have done and are doing to combat this issue. You can follow suit and we are here to help. Let’s mobilize our communities, and take a stand against tobacco industry marketing. If you launch a letter writing campaign, or work with your local papers to sign resolutions not to accept tobacco industry advertising or fund let us know so we can support you in your efforts and link you with others doing the same thing.
  • Also, don’t forget if you see ads, receive promo material, or see anything distributed by the tobacco industry make sure to document these examples by contacting www.trinketsandtrash.org.
  • Finally, we’re hosting a Network call on Wednesday, April 13th at 3pm EST for folks to share and ask for advice on their local strategies. Please register by clicking this link and entering your info so we can contact you with details and join us then!

EDIT: You may find a new Network video useful. It’s a video, with stats of how the tobacco industry has targetted the LGBT community over the years. This may be something tangible, and interesting, to share with your LGBT colleagues and media groups in an interactive, compelling way:

Special thanks to:

Naphtali Offen, Joseph Lee, JamieLou Delavan, Bob Gordon, Bill Snook, Francisco Michel, Robin Hobart, Johnn Young, Trudie Jackson, Sasha Kaufmann, Dean Andersen, Olivia Kaski

social media · Uncategorized

Tobacco Industry's Newest Target: Hipsters

In a recent Media Network Web-cast with the Office of Smoking Health, Stacey Anderson and her colleagues presented on their research: Acceptable Rebellion’: Marketing Hipster Aesthetics to Sell Camel Cigarettes in the U.S.

As an urban resident myself, hipsters are a trademark of my area. Ever impressed with their sense of style, I’ll see hipsters hanging out on their stoops or in front of dive bars/cultural venues with their bicycles, tight pants, plaid and retro/alternative clothing. However, just as ubiquitous as the edgy haircuts and tattoe are the cigarettes in their hands. Which is not far from the truth as 56% of hipsters smoke.

So why are these numbers so high? According to the presentation/article, hipsters seek outlets for freedom and self-expression. They admire the kitsch, absurd, eccentric, and Camel has positioned itself to deliver what hipsters are attracted to.

Why has Camel targeted hipsters? For one, since mainstream advertising options have been restricted, tobacco industries have become acquainted with targeting underground, “alternative lifestyles” (ex. the LGBT community).

What makes hipsters easier targets is their often nihilistic outlook on life that influences them to disregard traditional health warnings against smoking.

The tobacco industry is also aware that “underground” culture influences the market, and while hipsters typically intend to be anti-establishment, they often set mainstream trends.

To overcome the fact that hipsters reject mainstream messages, tobacco marketers admittedly aim to get hipsters to think that they started the trend of smoking.

Just as the tobacco industry has targeted sub-cultural groups by essentially manipulating and inverting their own values against themselves, we need to be less straightforward with our intervention strategy. For instance, perhaps we should expose the manipulation of the tobacco industry’s attempt to infuse a corporate, mainstream product into their culture. Another idea that the presenter brought up would be to use advertising campaigns that hipsters may find attractive, like internet based relatable UrbanFuel.org and XpoZLV.com. The latter of which also hosts smokefree alternative concerts.

For more information on this, an abstract and summary of the article is available at the following link. ‘Acceptable Rebellion’: Marketing Hipster Aesthetics to Sell Camel Cigarettes in the U.S.,  (Tobacco Control, June 2010), Yogi Hendlin, Ph.D. candidate, UC Los Angeles and Stacey Anderson, Ph.D., UC San Francisco.

Blog post by Emilia Dunham

Network Program Associate

 

 

Bookmark and Share

 

social media

Tobacco Industry’s Newest Target: Hipsters

In a recent Media Network Web-cast with the Office of Smoking Health, Stacey Anderson and her colleagues presented on their research: Acceptable Rebellion’: Marketing Hipster Aesthetics to Sell Camel Cigarettes in the U.S.

As an urban resident myself, hipsters are a trademark of my area. Ever impressed with their sense of style, I’ll see hipsters hanging out on their stoops or in front of dive bars/cultural venues with their bicycles, tight pants, plaid and retro/alternative clothing. However, just as ubiquitous as the edgy haircuts and tattoe are the cigarettes in their hands. Which is not far from the truth as 56% of hipsters smoke.

So why are these numbers so high? According to the presentation/article, hipsters seek outlets for freedom and self-expression. They admire the kitsch, absurd, eccentric, and Camel has positioned itself to deliver what hipsters are attracted to.

Why has Camel targeted hipsters? For one, since mainstream advertising options have been restricted, tobacco industries have become acquainted with targeting underground, “alternative lifestyles” (ex. the LGBT community).

What makes hipsters easier targets is their often nihilistic outlook on life that influences them to disregard traditional health warnings against smoking.

The tobacco industry is also aware that “underground” culture influences the market, and while hipsters typically intend to be anti-establishment, they often set mainstream trends.

To overcome the fact that hipsters reject mainstream messages, tobacco marketers admittedly aim to get hipsters to think that they started the trend of smoking.

Just as the tobacco industry has targeted sub-cultural groups by essentially manipulating and inverting their own values against themselves, we need to be less straightforward with our intervention strategy. For instance, perhaps we should expose the manipulation of the tobacco industry’s attempt to infuse a corporate, mainstream product into their culture. Another idea that the presenter brought up would be to use advertising campaigns that hipsters may find attractive, like internet based relatable UrbanFuel.org and XpoZLV.com. The latter of which also hosts smokefree alternative concerts.

For more information on this, an abstract and summary of the article is available at the following link. ‘Acceptable Rebellion’: Marketing Hipster Aesthetics to Sell Camel Cigarettes in the U.S.,  (Tobacco Control, June 2010), Yogi Hendlin, Ph.D. candidate, UC Los Angeles and Stacey Anderson, Ph.D., UC San Francisco.

Blog post by Emilia Dunham

Network Program Associate

 

 

Bookmark and Share

 

webinar

Youth BrownBag Webinar: Back to School Edition

Youth BrownBag Networking Webinar: Back to School Edition

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

3PM EST

Please join us and the National Youth Advocacy Coalition for a conversation with service providers for LGBTQ youth. What are your strengths and your challenges? What kind of support do you need in this work? Want to strategize on how to build the strengths of your LGBTQ youth programming? For answers and to share opinions on these questions and much more, spend an hour with NYAC and your colleagues for a lively discussion!

This discussion will be moderated by jb beeson and shay(den) gonzalez from NYAC. jb beeson currently serves as the Deputy Executive Director at NYAC and comes from fierce, progressive organizing and community building with queer youth of color communities in California. shay gonzalez comes to NYAC from the Streetwork Project, a drop-in center for homeless and transient youth in Manhattan where he actively developed groups and workshops with, and for, young people around gender, race, class and how they relate to sex and sexuality.

If you would like to register for this call click here. Call in information will be sent directly to registrants.

About the BrownBag Series: Linking people and information: The BrownBag Networking call series is designed to be an open space for, you guessed it, the Network. So pull up a chair and enjoy a virtual lunch with as to network, share, and collaborate with collogues from around the country.

Minnesota · Puerto Rico · social media

Communications Training with Kinsale Communications

By Scout,
Director, Network for LGBT Tobacco Control

Morning all! Hey, I’m in a convening of the Minnesota statewide tobacco disparity networks and this morning we’ve got Steve Kinsella here, a former PR guy for Daschle and others, giving us a training on Communications Strategies. So… instead of taking notes, I thought, why not just blog some of the high points?

So, see him in the pic to the right starting with the key elements of an effective communications plan.

Key Elements of An Effective Communications Plan

  • Goal — what you are trying to accomplish
  • Strategy — how you will accomplish it
  • Audience — who your campaign is directed towards
  • Message — your guiding theme. Must include a value + ask. Examples include: “Keep our children away from 2ndhand smoke.” “Don’t make the workers choose between their job and clean air.”
  • Soundbites — pretty obvious, examples above.

One thing lots of us struggle about is… not understanding what is news. Helping to understand that helps us understand how to make it.

What makes News?

News is an event, occurrence, or action that has an impact on the audience in either a direct or emotional sense.

Direct impact: something that directly affects the reader or his environment, friends, pocketbook, etc. Examples include: tax increases, insurance costs, unhealthy environment, crime, decisions affecting schools, etc.

Emotional impact: something that strikes the emotional chord (anger, fear, sadness, happiness), more emotion, higher news value. Examples include: puppy in well, death of celebrity, airplane landing on Hudson, etc.

Add conflict! Steve says, “Never be afraid of conflict.” Conflict is a short story, it’s tension that draws eyes. Just keep your message focused so it seems like you’re the Luke Skywalker not Darth Vader. Example brought up is the local pride, where the organizers (lots of smokers) feel that they’ve made a large health area, and that’s enough, making all of pride smokefree would hurt it. Steve suggested wade right into that conflict with your messaging. Ask questions, and some might be listened to better if you seed them via community members, not just through your organization. What about having a community member write in public forum, “But what are we teaching our youth if we have a big health section then we’re exposing them to smoke everywhere else in pride?”

Other tips to make your info into news. Make it local. Add graphics. Keep it timely. Put human face on it. Keep it simple!

Uh-oh, he’s talking about New Media now! I’ll post this and start to work on a 2nd post with that info.