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A Very Special Roundup

Each week, LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón bring you a round-up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

This week our top article comes from LGBT HealthLink’s very own Dr. Jenna JennaWintemberg, active member of our Community Advisory Council. Thank you for the work you do!

 

Smokefree Policies Help Queer Folks Quit

Researchers found that LGBT smokers in Missouri were significantly more likely than those who had quit smoking to live in communities that allow smoking in places like restaurants and bars, where the LGBT community has traditionally gathered and been exposed to tobacco. Moreover, 94% of queer smokers in communities with a smoking ban wanted to quit compared to just 76% of those in places without bans.

 

Colorado Study Schools Youth Disparities

A survey by the state of Colorado revealed staggering disparities among the state’s LGBT high school students, including triple the use of tobacco, quadruple the rate of suicide attempts, and more abuse of substances. Denver’s ABC 7 dug into the details and shared that trans students who felt safe in their schools were 2.3 times less likely to have attempted suicide.

 

Syphilis Scares this STD Awareness Month

The CDC announced, as part of its April STD Awareness Month program, more data suggesting syphilis is a growing problem in the U.S. – especially among queer individuals. The just-announced 2015 numbers were the highest in 20 years, and 82% of the cases were among queer men. Moreover, half of the queer men reporting syphilis infection were also living with HIV.

 

GrowSomeGay Prostate Cancer Survivors Face Isolation, Vulnerability

A UK study examined the experiences of prostate cancer survivors who were under 65 and either gay or unpartnered, and found that both face problems like isolation from having a disease that greatly effects sexuality, especially at a younger age than most men who develop the cancer. The researchers added that gay prostate cancer survivors have unique needs, and require better access to targeted information and support.

 

Doc Defends Trans Community’s Right to Care

A gynecologist opined in Rewire that doctors treating transgender patients should remember the oath they take to not let a patient’s identity stand in the way of quality care, and to remember the doctor’s code to “do no harm.” The good doctor warns that policies allowing anti-trans discrimination in the name of a doctor’s constitutional freedoms ignore the basic principles of medical care.

 

UNAIDS Launches Antidiscrimination Finder

UNAIDS launched a new website that allows you to search for tools from all around the world on combatting HIV-related stigma and discrimination. The search engine even allows you to zero in on tools specific to different populations, such as the LGBT community, women, or racial minorities.

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Weekly Wellness Roundup For Your Monday

Each week, LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón bring you a round-up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

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Study Shines Light on Anal Cancer Screening

Researchers in Australia found that for queer men seeking anal cytology (that is, Pap tests that screen for anal cancer) were more likely to have a satisfactory test if they had no history of chlamydia or gonorrhea, had fewer receptive anal sex partners and other factors possibly related to having anal sex less frequently. It suggests that queer men may need interventions such as instructions on douching and multiple tests in order to avoid unsatisfactory results.

 

Queer Girls May Have Smoking Disparity Over Boys

Researchers found that lesbian high school students were 2.9 times more likely than heterosexual girls to smoke cigarettes and bisexual students were 3.7 times more likely. Queer girls were also more likely than heterosexual girls to smoke cigars and e-cigarettes. Queer male youth, on the other hand, were about on par with heterosexual boys, in contrast to other studies that have shown disparities for them, as well.

 

Data Changes Could Save Lives

The Deseret News reported that efforts to curb the teen suicide rate in Utah – which doubled between 2009 and 2016 – are hindered because data is missing on a key group: LGBT teens. Utah, along with half the nation’s states, does not ask about sexual orientation in its Youth Risk Behavior Survey. That makes it hard to effectively tackle the youth suicide spike, given that LGBT youth tend to have disproportionate mental health needs.

 

NC Pulls a Fast One on HB2

LGBT organizations condemned North Carolina’s effort at repealing HB2, the “bathroom bill” that ordered transgender people to use bathrooms corresponding with their legal sex and banned LGBT protections statewide. Advocates argued that the so-called repeal does nothing to protect LGBT individuals and called on companies and organizations like the NCAA to continue their protests.

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Queer Men See Bigger Jump in Mental Health Services

A study found that while both sexual minority men and women use mental health services more than heterosexual men and women, respectively, the queer-heterosexual gap is bigger for men than for women. Women in general use mental health services more than men do, but among LGB individuals, men and women are about equal in usage of mental health care.

 

HRC Releases Equality Index

LGBT Weekly reported on HRC’s tenth edition of its Healthcare Equality Index, which rates healthcare facilities on their policies to deliver quality care to LGBT patients. 590 healthcare centers voluntarily completed HRC’s survey, and 303 received the designation of “Leader in LGBTQ Healthcare Equality.” Way to go!

LGBT HealthLink is building community wellness through training, education & policy change. Click here to join us! Membership is FREE!

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This Week’s LGBT Wellness Roundup: Good News and Bad

Each week, LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón bring you a round-up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

 

Good News and Bad News on HPV Vaccine

Researchers found some good news for queer women regarding HPV: lesbian women seem to be getting vaccinated at about the same rate as heterosexual women, and bisexual women are getting vaccinated most of all. The bad news? The numbers are still below targets among all women, with about 27% of bisexual women and only 17% of other women having been vaccinated.

 

Youth Face Barriers Coming Out

US News and World Report explored the challenges for LGBT youth in coming out to their providers, noting that parents generally have access to medical records until children turn 18. The American Academy of Pediatrics nonetheless recommends that doctors avoid informing parents of a child’s sexual orientation or gender identity to ensure the patient can safely access care.

 

Relationship Between Victimization and Smoking

Researchers found that lesbian and bisexual women were 3.5 and 2.4 times more likely, respectively, to experience childhood victimization than were heterosexual women. Moreover, they found that women victimized as children were more likely to be victimized as adults, and that adult victimization was associated with a higher likelihood of being a smoker, suggesting an indirect link between victimization of sexual minority youth and lifetime smoking habits.

 

ChangesPolicy Changes Could Hurt Community

The Center for American Progress reported that repealing the Affordable Care Act could hurt LGBT Americans, many of whom have gained insurance since the law began to take effect (despite still having double the uninsured rate of non-LGBT people). CAP also reported that the government is rolling back data collection on LGBT health, which could eliminate evidence of disparities and needs.

 

Health Risks for Sexual Minority Transwomen

A study found that sexual minority transwomen were 2.3 times as likely to have had a heavy drinking episode in the past six months than were heterosexual transwomen, and were also 3.6 times as likely to have illicitly used prescription drugs. The results suggest that this understudied subgroup of trans individuals faces unique risks that warrant further research.

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New Initiative Launching at HBCUs

Human Rights Campaign (HRC) announced a partnership with the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions to promote best practices and programming for LGBT students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). The initiative will include disseminating information on LGBT health and wellness to HBCUs around the country and in developing programs to foster inclusion and empowerment.

LGBT HealthLink is building community wellness through training, education & policy change. Click here to join us! Membership is FREE!

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Youth, Women, And Stress In This Week’s Roundup

Each week LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón bring you a round-up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

Research Lacking on Queer Youth Cessation

A review of research found a lack of data on tobacco cessation for LGBTQ youth, even though LGBTQ youth smoke at a much higher rate than others. Of the 21 relevant studies that had been published since 2000, only one specifically targeted young adults, meaning there are many more studies counting how many LGBTQ youth smoke than figuring out how to help them quit.

Major National Study Explores LGBTQ Aging slide_369760_4254986_free

US News and World Report covered an undergoing study on LGBTQ aging, in which government-funded researchers are tracking 2,400 queer adults. Among the findings: more than two-thirds of LGBTQ older adults have experienced victimization at some point in their lives, with transgender and bisexual individuals – as well as racial and ethnic minorities – especially at risk.

Kids “Get” Marriage Equality with Age

A study of Toronto children found that the majority supported same-sex marriage, and that older children (such as those in their early teens) thought more favorably of marriage equality and same-sex relationships generally than did younger children (those aged 5-8). Older kids were also more likely to justify their opinion with arguments of personal freedom and nondiscrimination.

IWDWomen’s Day Means Trans Women, Too

Mic reported on the inclusion of transgender individuals on International Women’s Day, which was recognized on March 8. The organizer of the Women’s March in New York, Carmen Perez, stressed that the fight for gender equality must include eliminating discrimination based on gender identity, a sentiment that was echoed by countless activists on social media.

Study Explores Minority Stress and Mental Health

Researchers found that among sexual minority young adults, the relationship between mental health symptoms and the timing of reaching sexual minority milestones is complicated. For example, among young lesbian women, researching these milestones later in life was associated with more symptoms of depression, whereas for gay men, doing so was associated with fewer depressive and anxious symptoms.

TogetherAloneQueer Loneliness Explored in Essay

The Huffington Post published an excellent essay on loneliness in the queer community, and how it relates to the mental health disparities the community faces – disparities that persist despite the legal advancements the community has made in recent years.

 

 

LGBT HealthLink is building community wellness through training, education & policy change. Click here to join us! Membership is FREE!

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Weekly Wellness Roundup Has Juicy News For You!

Each week LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón bring you a round-up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

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What Lesbian Women Do Way More Often

A study found that lesbian women are more likely that bisexual and heterosexual women to report they usually climaxed during sexual activity, with 86% of lesbian women saying so compared to 66% of bisexual and 65% of heterosexual women. Gay (89%) and bisexual (88%) men were about equal to heterosexual men (95%). Factors like relationship satisfaction and type of sexual activity made a difference in how often one achieved this feat.

 

Queer Patients Face Disparities in Cancer Care

A first-of-its-kind U.K. study found that sexual minority cancer patients face many disparities in the care they receive, including feeling more isolation than other patients, experiencing heteronormativity from providers and resources, and not being included in decision-making. Researchers recommend more provider training in LGBT care and better monitoring of sexual orientation in care and research.

 

Patients Say: Ask Me About Trans

Researchers found that a majority of transgender patients want their healthcare providers to know their gender identity, with 89.1% saying it was important for their primary care providers to know. 57% also think it’s important for their primary care doctors to know their sexual orientation. The results support the idea of increasing LGBT data collection in healthcare settings.

 

Crisis Calls Rise after Trans Rules Rescinded

Crisis hotlines for LGBT youth experienced a rise in calls after the White House rescinded rules that protected transgender students in schools by ensuring that they could use the bathrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identities. NBC reported that such protections are necessary to protect the health of transgender youth, according to experts.

 

Barriers Faced by Black Trans Individuals

Buzzfeed shared the stories of fifteen transgender African Americans and the challenges they encounter in accessing healthcare. Many highlighted instances of being treated rudely or even hostilely by healthcare providers, and shared how those experiences impacted their health and wellness.

 

New Series Showcases LGBT Heroes

ABC premiered a new mini-series, entitled When We Rise, telling the inspiring stories of some of the leaders in the LGBT rights movement. The selected stories highlight the community’s struggles with mental health, the HIV crisis, and access to gender-affirming care.

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Swipe Right for Sexual Health and Other LGBT Wellness News

Each week LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón bring you a round-up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

 

swiperightUsers Swipe Right for Sexual Health Info

A study explored having an HIV health educator create a profile on queer networking apps like Grindr and Scruff, and take questions from users. The strategy proved effective for connecting men to information, which researchers believe is because the counselor was a member of the community and did not target users but rather let them initiative the conversations.

 

Protections for Trans Kids Revoked

The White House repealed an Obama administration policy that guaranteed transgender students access to bathrooms and locker rooms matching their gender identity. Activists rallied around the country, arguing that protections are necessary to ensure the health and safety of trans youth. Supporters are also fighting against bills at the state level, with ads like this in Texas.

 

Sexual Minorities at Risk for Heart Disease heartmd

A new review of evidence found that both sexual minority men and women had heightened risk for cardiovascular disease, the result of factors such as higher tobacco use, drug use, and mental health issues. Queer women had even more heightened risk factors for heart disease, including higher alcohol consumption and body mass index when compared to other women.

 

Prostate Cancer Research Lacking for Queer Men

Researchers found that among studies on sexual functioning and sense of masculinity of prostate cancer survivors, 65 percent did not measure sexual orientation; of those that did, all but one focused on heterosexual rather than queer men. They concluded that more study is needed on how factors like sexual orientation impact the sexual health of prostate cancer survivors.

 

Healthcare Changes Could Be “Devastating”

Mic published an op-ed arguing that the repeal of the Affordable Care Act and rolling back of Medicaid – changes currently under consideration by the White House and Congress – could hit the transgender community particularly hard. The ACA made it illegal to discriminate against transgender individuals and expanded coverage for the low-income, including many transgender people.

 

rainbow007A Not-So-Secret Agent for Smoking

Talk about living dangerously. Researchers found that although James Bond’s smoking has declined over the decades, as has his use of smoking-related gadgets (like a rocket hidden in a cigarette), he is still picking up a lot of second-hand smoke from his sexual partners. LGBT viewers – themselves 50 percent more likely to smoke than others – could use a better role model. It’s 2017, 007!

 

LGBT HealthLink is building community wellness through training, education & policy change. Click here to join us! Membership is FREE!

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Gender Neutral Bathrooms And Much More LGBT Wellness News

Each week LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón bring you a round-up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

 

LGBT HealthLink is building community wellness through training, education & policy change. Click here to join us!

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New Clues on Queer Mental Health

ThinkProgress shared two new reports on LGB mental health. An Australian study found that sexual orientation does not lead to poorer mental health outcomes, but that the negative experiences LGB people have ― like lack of social support and smoking ― can contribute to poor mental health. Meanwhile, a UK Christian organization reported that churches that share negative views of sexual minorities likely contribute to stress and worse mental health.

 

CVS Is Making Us Healthier

Nice work, CVS! A study found that cigarette smokers who had been buying cigarettes at CVS before it stopped selling them nationwide were 38% likelier to stop buying cigarettes, and that states with many CVS stores had a decline in total packs sold per smoker compared to states with no CVS stores. It’s great news for the queer community, which continues to smoke about 50% more than others.

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Mixed News on HIV Progress

The CDC announced that new HIV infections dropped 18 percent from 2008 to 2014, but the progress was mixed. Infections among queer men aged 13 to 24 were down, but the rate actually increased for those aged 25 to 34. Additionally, while queer men generally saw a declining rate, black queer men saw no progress, and infections were actually up by 20% among queer Latino men. Overall, queer men accounted for a staggering 73% of all new infections as of 2014.

 

Trans Folk Have More Days of Bad Health

A study in several states found that transgender people were 1.7 times more likely than cisgender individuals to report only fair or poor health. Additionally, they had an average of 2.37 more days per month in which their physical health was not good, and 1.7 more days in which their mental health was not good. They were also 1.8 times more likely to not have health insurance.

 

bathroomYouth Want Gender-Neutral Bathrooms

Researchers found that LGBT youth can feel uncomfortable or even unsafe using public bathrooms in schools and elsewhere, and that they saw more gender-neutral bathrooms as being an important part of the solution. The request makes sense given that many of the youths’ negative experiences in bathrooms happened in gender-specific, multi-stall restrooms.

 

Newsflash: Don’t Call Queer Moms “Fellas”

Well, this should probably go without saying. A UK hospital caused a stir when it ordered its midwives (a term that itself might be due for a change) to not refer to partners of expectant mothers as “fellas” when those partners include lesbian partners. The order was issued after same-sex partners felt uncomfortable with the terminology during a maternity class.

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Why It’s Good To Be Gay and A Parent, And More LGBT Wellness News

Each week LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak-Rincón, bring you a round up of some of the biggest LGBTQ wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBTQ Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

 

The Kids (of Gay Parents) Are Alright

Researchers found that children with lesbian mothers and children with gay fathers both had low levels of emotional or behavioral issues. Gay fathers reported even less internalization of problems among their children than did lesbian mothers, countering the idea that children with two fathers may have adjustment problems.

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Trans Rights Targeted by Several States

Mother Jones reported that transgender rights were under attack in eleven states, where laws have been proposed that try to prevent trans people from using public restrooms, force schools to “out” transgender students to their parents, and more. Advocates say these laws put transgender people at risk of violence, harm mental health, and have other adverse health impacts.

 

Sexually Active Youth More Likely to Smoke

Researchers found that youth are more likely to use cigarettes, e-cigarettes, or both if they are sexually active, and even more so if they had had more than three sexual partners. Youth were more likely to use both traditional and e-cigarettes if they reported not using a condom the last time they had sex. Previous research has found that queer youth are more likely to smoke and “vape.”

 

anxietyTrans Youth Have Higher Anxiety but Not Depression

A study found that transgender children who have socially transitioned had slightly higher anxiety than other children, but did not have higher rates of depression or lower self-worth. The results differ from previous research, which has mostly looked at youth who had not socially transitioned and who reported high rates of mental health challenges.

 

Journal Highlights LGBT Smoking Disparities

LGBT Health released its first issue of 2017, highlighting smoking disparities in the queer community in two articles: one exploring what factors make queer women more likely to be smokers, and another investigating the barriers and facilitators to LGBT people quitting smoking.

 

Fertility Options Expanding for Trans Youth

News Hour reported that trans health advocates are drawing on fertility research originally intended for cancer patients to encounter new options for transgender youth to preserve their fertility. Trans youth who want the option to have children in the future face limited options, but solutions may be coming – like using a piece of ovarian tissue to develop a mature egg.

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Putting Off That Mammo? See Yourself Here in our Weekly Wellness Roundup

Each week LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak, bring you a round up of some of the biggest LGBT wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBT Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

 

mammomodelQueer Breast Cancer Awareness Effort Launched

Buzzfeed reported that a breast cancer organization in Australia is launching an ad campaign to encourage at-risk queer folks to get screened. Citing the fact that LGBT individuals are less likely to meet mammography guidelines, the campaign’s organizers hope it will help close the gap. Did we mention the photos are flawless?

 

Transgender Population Faces Tobacco Crisis

Researchers found that transgender individuals had almost double the odds of using a tobacco product in the past month when compared to cisgender (that is, non-transgender) individuals. Big disparities were found in cigarettes, cigars, and e-cigarettes, with the latter showing the biggest gap: most than 21% of trans folks used e-cigarettes, compared to just 5% of cisgender individuals.

 

LGB Youth Face Disparities in Custody

A study found that youth in correctional facilities were disproportionately sexual minorities, especially among girls, of whom 39.4% identified as LGB and another 18.5% identified as “mostly straight.” Additionally, gay and bisexual boys faced more than 10 times the odds of experiencing sexual victimization while in custody as compared to heterosexual boys.

 

PrEP Uptake Slow Among At-Risk African Americans

Researchers attending Black Gay Pride Events found that just 4.6% of African American men who have sex with men and transgender women were on PrEP, the HIV prevention drug. Also troubling: just 39% of participants were even aware of PrEP. Being in a relationship, having recently been tested for HIV, and being out were all associated with being aware of PrEP.

 

Journal Examines Queer Aging hispanic-elders

The Gerontologist released a supplemental issue on LGBT aging. One article on intersectional disparities found that African American and Hispanic older adults faced many issues (like lower income and social support) that reduced health-related quality of life. However, these groups had higher spirituality, which was associated with an increase in psychological health.

 

Cooking Up Solutions in Cancer Survivorship

STAT recently covered a topic in cancer care that’s rarely discussed – how individuals can lose their sense of taste during cancer treatment and have trouble eating as a result – as well as what creative chefs are doing about it. Research has shown that LGBT cancer survivors already report lower satisfaction with care, meaning this kitchen-based research could benefit the community.

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Sleep, ACA, Youth, and Inmates. We’ve Got It All Right Here in the Weekly Wellness Roundup

Each week LGBT HealthLink, a Program of CenterLink, and researcher and blogger Corey Prachniak, bring you a round up of some of the biggest LGBT wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBT Wellness, visit a page dedicated to the topic here.

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Queer Folks Are Losing Sleep – Literally

Researchers found that queer adults are at higher risk for sleep disturbances, which can prevent someone from getting a full night’s rest. Queer women were even more likely than queer men to wake up during the night. Other health disparities and socioeconomic differences only partially explained the results, meaning queer adults may need targeted assistance to help them rest easy.

 

Endocrinologists Untrained on Trans Health

Yikes. Researchers found that while most endocrinologists (doctors focused on hormones) have had at least one transgender patient, more than 80 percent never received training on transgender care. Very little of the training that did occur happened at medical schools, with doctors learning more through methods like online trainings, lectures, and continuing education.

 

Teaching Queer Men on Testicular Cancer testicular-cancer

A study of 29 Irishmen found that gay and bi men wanted to learn about testicular cancer in largely the same way as did heterosexual men. Some expressed desire for integrative and inclusive campaigns that targeted all men, while others wanted targeted campaigns for the queer community that build on its strengths (such as male partners getting tested together) and address disparities.

 

ACA Repeal Could Hurt Queer Community

Broadly opined that repealing the Affordable Care Act – the process for which has already begun in Congress – could disproportionately harm LGBT folks. For example, the ACA expanded coverage of mental health services (which LGBT people disproportionately need) and prohibited discrimination based on sex, which the Obama administration extended to trans folks, as well.

 

transyouthWhat Trans Youth Think About the Future

A study of trans youth and their families found that there were many barriers to envisioning a happy future, including facing discrimination, denials of civil rights, and dealing with healthcare issues such as insurance and high costs. On the other hand, they were also hopeful that things would change for the better – a reflection of recent advancements in policies and pop culture.

 

First Trans Inmate Receives Surgery

PBS reported that a California inmate became the first trans person in history to receive trans-affirming surgery during incarceration. The state government settled a lawsuit with the woman in 2015 and laid out a process for trans patients to receive the surgery if doctors deem it medically necessary – the same standard applied for any other medical procedure.