Upcoming Conference! Unity through Diversity: A national LGBT people of color health summit

New Network Logo Symbol 3-2011

 

 
Upcoming conference calls for proposals 
Unity Through Diversity: A National People of Color Health Summit
February 20-23rd, 2014 | Albany, NY 

 

The Unity Through Diversity: A National LGBT People of Color Health Conference, being held in Albany NY, february 20-23rd is seeking workshop proposals!

This year’s focus is on “The Power of Unity”;

This year, the LGBT movement has taken enormous strides in the struggle for marriage equality. For LGBT POC, however, our struggle is far from over. In this same year we have also lost family and community members to violence against transgender people, HIV/AIDS, suicide, bullying, ableism, and homelessness. Additionally, the disproportionate incarceration rates among people of color – particularly among African Americans – and the racial profiling so prevalent in our society continues to put the safety of young African Americans at risk. Our struggle is not over.

There are only a few days left to submit your proposal, so hurry up and get those in by Nov. 15th! For information on proposals, click HERE.

Additionally, there are scholarship (and sponsorship) opportunities- so spread the word!

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Being a Media Star: Tips for Media Appearance Success

Sarah J. Jackson

Guest Blogger

Reporting from Netroots Nation 2012, Providence, RI

 

 

Media strategist/trainer Joel Silberman gave a great training at Netroots today titled “Presence and Authenticity: The Key to Being a Media Star.” Below are Silberman’s tips on embodying the charisma required for successful media interviews:

Having charisma onscreen:

  • Visualize being rooted into the ground like a tree, this will help you appear grounded onscreen.
  • Your energy should be big; your aura does not end with your body; visualize radiating your energy and points out into the room around you as you speak, or what Silberman calls, “an energy shower.”
  • Make sure you know where the camera is!
  • Don’t cross your arms across your chest or groin when you speak, this looks defensive and will collapse your posture. Find a neutral position for your hands by your sides and only gesture within the “strike zone” (between your shoulders and waist).
  • Focus your eyes on the person who is interviewing you, or if talking directly to a camera focus your eyes on the lens. Silberman says, “The camera has to be the person you want to sleep with. Right now.”
  • Only project your voice as far as necessary to reach the camera, otherwise you will sound loud (which translates to angry on TV).
  • Follow the three S’s: SMILE; keep it SIMPLE; and hold STILL.
  • There is no such thing as being too polished but you should be careful not to seem slick; if you find yourself simply rehearsing answers you will come across as disingenuous.

Other handy tips:

  • Do yoga! That’s right, the posture, alignment and presence that is taught is yoga are the same as those you need to maintain an impressive onscreen presence.
  • You never have to answer a question you are asked if you don’t feel you can produce a good answer, or if it is off topic. Feel free to use the line, “I really appreciate you saying that, but what we really need to focus on is…”
  • Don’t apologize for what you are saying. Be aware of being so “nice” that you sound as if you are apologizing for your statements. Never begin a sentence with “I’m sorry but…” Coming across stern is better than coming across as if you are unsure of the truth of what you are saying.

Organizing and Messaging Tips From Communities of Color

 Sarah J. Jackson

 Guest Blogger

 Reporting from Netroots Nation, Providence, RI

One of the amazing things about Netroots Nation is that it brings together folks from a large range of causes and identities to share their secrets to successful organizing. Panelists at “Salsa, Cumbia and Merengue: Connecting to the Different Beats of the Latino Electorate” and “Promoting People of Color in the Progressive Blogosphere,” had some great ideas on not only creating inclusive messaging but messaging that is effective across various communities.

1. Meet the People Where They Are

Tomás Garduño from New Mexico New Majority (NMNM) discussed the fact that while many Latinos don’t identify with the term “environmentalist,” their relationship to agriculture as a result of their labor position in the U.S. has led immigrants in New Mexico to feel a deep connection to the land. As a result organizations like NMNM have had great success in organizing Latino voters on issues of environmental health and safety by linking them to issues of labor and food justice.

The Lesson: We shouldn’t discount the possibility of effective organizing with groups who don’t align with our definitions. Our messages and organizing must be sensitive to the specific needs and experiences of the communities we hope to reach.

2. Be Issue Intersectional

According to Mobilize the Immigrant Vote California, the state’s first statewide, multiracial coalition using community organizing to empower immigrant voters from both the Asian and Latino communities, organizers should “promote constructive dialogue on potentially divisive issues, and support solidarity among marginalized groups.” Weather mobilizing for LGBT rights, immigrant rights, or women’s rights, community messaging must acknowledge the intersections of these issues. Check out the educational tools MIV uses to address LGBT and reproductive rights issues with their target community.

The Lesson: Issues don’t exist in a vacuum, for organizing and messaging to be effective we have to take into consideration the ways multiple issues effect our communities.

3. Ask the Question: “Who Did We Invite?”

According to David Reid, founder of the Black Kos, all organizations must ask themselves the question; “Who did we invite?” both online and off in order to be as inclusive as possible. Many organizations miss out on including diverse voices, and thus reaching a diverse electorate, because they don’t make an effort to reach out to historically marginalized groups. Reid says, “If your organization doesn’t  look like the demographics of America, you’re missing something.”

The Lesson: Well? Who did your organization invite? Who do you target your messaging to?

4. Invest in Youth

According to the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, “when youth have the knowledge, inspiration, and solutions they need to address the challenges they face, they can make a difference.” Youth bring fresh perspectives, technological know how, and generally don’t carry with them the cynicism that older organizers do. No matter the cause or movement, youth should be encouraged and trained to be future leaders. Check out some of the ways the Ella Baker Center is engaging youth.

The Lesson: They’ll still be around when we’re gone, let’s make all our spaces and tools youth friendly!

We’ll be having a blogtastic time!

 
 
The Network for LGBT Health Equity
Bloggin’ it up
 
 
 
 

The Network is super pleased to announce our two fabulous scholarship recipients and guest bloggers who will be attending Netroots Nation 2012 with us in Providence, RI!

 

Sarah J. Jackson is a Postdoctoral Teaching Associate at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. Her work focuses on how issues of social identity and social justice are covered by mass media. Follow her on Twitter at @sjjphd.

 

 

e. shor identifies as a sassy, genderqueer, immigrant jew. e.shor is a student of the world, an advocate and organizer of LGBTQ health initiatives, and lover of canoes. They believe that humor and genuine communication is the best way to build healthy, vibrant communities. Their dream work is to empower and educate LGBTQ communities about public health issues in our communities.

 


We are so stoked to get to hang out with these two fierce, activist bloggers at Netroots Nation! Be sure to check back here frequently, because they will be bloggin’ it UP!

Blogger Nicole VanKim Takes On Boston

by Gustavo Torrez

Program Manager

For the next four weeks you all with get a front row seat as blogger Nicole VanKim takes on Boston attending the Summer Institute put on by the Population Center at the Fenway Institute.

The Summer Institute provides participants with foundational training in interdisciplinary theory, knowledge and methods for conducting population research in sexual and gender minority health. Held over four weeks at Fenway Health and Boston University, the Summer
Institute will include:

  1. A dynamic Cornerstone Seminar in LGBT Health and Social Life that will overview key topics, methods, and perspectives in the interdisciplinary study of LGBT Health
  2. An intermediate-level statistics and quantitative Data Analysis Course
  3. Hands-on training in analysis of LGBT population health data in the Interactive Data Lab

Nicole VanKim is an epidemiology student and National Institutes of Health predoctoral fellow in obesity prevention at the University of Minnesota. Here’s her snazzy picture here!

Blogging Scholar and Student Nicole VanKim

Her current work explores health inequities among 2-year and 4-year college students, particularly in the area of weight and weight-related behaviors such as physical activity, nutrition, and unhealthy weight control behaviors. Prior to pursuing her doctorate, Nicole was a CDC/CSTE Applied Epidemiology Fellow with the Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Bureau at the New Mexico Department of Health. While there, she developed New Mexico’s first LGBT health report and a statewide heart disease and stroke burden document. Nicole believes health is a social justice issue and as such she has worked with various health programs and community partners on epidemiology-based projects that highlight health inequities and social determinants of health. Nicole received her MPH in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota.

Shortly, you’ll be able to follow her posts at nvankimn.

Introducing Health Summit Blogging Scholar Emily (e.shor) Shor

by Emilia Dunham

Program Associate

 

We’re thilled to have Emily Shor who prefers e.shor represent us at the National LGBTI Health Summit in Bloomington Indiana! e.shor will be blogging for us, so follow all posts here throughout the weekend and next week!

e.shor is the Project Coordinator on a Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) grant through Rainbow Health Initiative to work on LGBTQ youth tobacco social media and policy building. This project will focus on preventative tobacco control methods by engaging community in LGBTQI specific media, training and advocacy around tobacco control. They are also working on community policies to reduce tobacco use in community spaces in the LGBTQI community in Minneapolis.

Here’s e.shor’s story:

When I emerged from the womb I had a mop of hair, a cheerful disposition and a healthy appetite. All of these things remain true. Let me extrapolate…My hair remains a part of my identity because it holds the buoyancy of my energy and a story of where my family has come from. My cheerful disposition usually manifests through bike rides where I sing to 80’s hair bands, bobbling around with people I love, and being soft and huggable. My healthy appetite is well-rounded and growing for hand-crafted foods, fruits and vegetables, social justice and anti-racism work, and growing strong queer communities.

Scholarship Opportunity! National LGBTI Health Summit 2011

Emilia Dunham, Program Associate

The Network is once again offering a blogging scholarship opportunity! Please apply to be sent to a fantastic LGBTI health summit!

The 2011 National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex (LGBTI) Health Summit will be held in beautiful Bloomington, Indiana July 16-19 2011. The LGBTI Health Summit is an opportunity for individuals working for the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and intersex people to meet and share ideas about health issue of concern to our community.

Attendees are health activists, medical care professionals, alternative and complementary health providers, outreach workers, mental health practitioners and concerned community members and allies. With the theme of crossroads, we anticipate changes such as health care reform, issues of LGBTI individuals aging into a changing medical and insurance system, and state and federal legislation that prominently impacts our community.

For more on the conference, visit their website: http://www.nationallgbtihealthsummit.com/

 

Applications are due Friday, July 8th, 2011 by noon EST.

Folks from ANY background, education and skill-levels are encouraged to apply.

Applications will only be accepted by email at lgbthealthequity@gmail.com

Please ensure the subject line reads: National LGBTI Health Summit 2011

To apply, please email BRIEF responses to the following questions:

1) Briefly describe why you want to go, and what you are hoping to get out of the conference:

2) Briefly describe what your involvement has been in tobacco control and other health arenas.

3) Briefly describe your experience using social media, especially writing blogs, and/or with promoting news through social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

4) Please let us know whether you are comfortable posting 2-4 blog entries per day while at the LGBTI Health Summit Bloomingtonconference, distributing fliers for and representing the Network and have your own computer with wireless connection.

5) Briefly describe if you are from of an underserved population (transgender, person of color, low-income, etc)

6) Include where you would be coming from?

7) List whether you would need a Full or Partial scholarship?
(Please mark with an X if you are applying for Full Scholarship or Partial Scholarship)
If you choose partial scholarship, please mark with an X what funding categories you will be applying for.

___ Full Scholarship (Airfare, Hotel, Ground Transportation, Meals)

OR

Partial Scholarship
___ Airfare
___ Food/Per Diem
___ Ground Transportation
___ Hotel (3-4 nights)

Applications will be reviewed by staff and decisions will be made no later than Monday, July 11th. If you have questions please contact lgbthealthequity@gmail.com.