Creating Change 2013 · Uncategorized

Setting the tone: Crafting an Agenda for the Black LGBT Community.

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    Trevoi Crump
   Guest Blogger 
   Setting the tone: Crafting an Agenda for the Black LGBT Community.
 

Ha, so you’re probably thinking, did he attend any other workshop where NBJC was not present? Yes! Yes, I did. However, NBJC and there resources were most beneficial to a lot of questions that I had upon arriving at Creating Change. Once again, this workshop was powerful, and also a little heated. I noticed during this presentation that when you place too many authoritive figures on a panel, things could either go well or things go go relatively bad. I believe during this particular presentation it was combination of both. Serving on the panel were many different people from different arenas of life such as: Earl Fowlkes, Jr – Center for Black Equity, Aisha Moodie-Mills – Center for American Progress, Stacy Long – National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Kylar Broadus – Trans People of Color Coalition and Curtis Lipscomb – Executive Director, KICK – The Agency for LGBT African Americans.

Many issues were discussed in the workshop, one that stuck out was how do we get better resources for the Black LGBT community, that are effective, so that we’re including the entire community. I learned that it will take work within ourselves before this can be accomplished. We continue to marginalize those issues in the Black Gay Community, that we don’t find to be important. And then we question why we don’t have accurate or up to date data. We as a community, need to produce more national surveys based around the Black LGBT community. Nonetheless, talking about these ideas is one thing. We need to identify exactly how to bridge the gap between not saying how we will achieve it, but actually achieving it! We must understand that many things that happen in our communities start with us! The question was posed “What is at stake if the Black LGBT community can’t seem to get our wealth together?” It was stated very simple. We as a race, won’t be here! It falls back to the power that consumes money and people. We have the peoople, but wheres the money. The Black LGBT community, has an extreme issue with complaining about the affects of what happens in our community. But we never donate to support each other, we can go out and pay $.475 for lattes or $40,000 for a car knowing we can’t afford it… but won’t set aside $20 to help build up resources for our community! Earl Fowlkes stated “We can’t continue to lift up one community. We have to lift everyone up, we are our brothers keeper.”

Creating Change 2013

Recap – A Flashback of Creating Change Day 3

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   Trevoi Crump
   Guest Blogger 
  Recap – Creating Change Day 3 
 
 
“It is change, continuing change, inevitable change, that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be. This, in turn, means that our statesmen, our businessmen, our every man must take on a science fictional way of thinking.” – Isaac Asmiov

•As I sit back and reflect on today’s festivities, I must say I’m completely in awe of all the information I consumed in one day. If you don’t remember, I’ve prepared a little refresher for your memory•

1. National Black Justice Coalition: This workshop was presented by Sharon J. Letterman-Hicks, Rodney King, Jr, Kimberly McLeod, and Je-Shawna Wholley. This workshop was absolutely amazing. It was great seeing so many young African American LGBT students, who are already activist in their local communities such as Marcus Lee from Morehouse, who wanted to know how to implement more programs such as NBJC on his HBCU college campus; or Shaunda from Boiling Springs, who took her issue of not having enough support from her own African American peers at her school, to the NBJC board members in hopes they would come up with numerous game plans to promote a change in that matter. I think this workshop was a sigh of relief for all college students in attendance. We saw the worries of other students, as well as heard the cries for help on each of their college campuses, but moreso, I myself felt better knowing that I’m not doing anything wrong , it’s not me. I was reassured to continue fighting for my rights as an LGBT African American young man.

2. Sex (Education) is a RIGHT: What a powerful workshop! It started off on a great note, I mean I was pretty friggin’ excited. Well, truthfully the topic “Sex Education” is what I really went for. Lol! But, I’m glad I did. The presentation, the presentors and the seminar it self completely dynamic; they took sex education to another level and made it easier to fully understand. They stressed the importance of knowing and understanding your sexuality, but most importantly practicing safe SEX!  They informed us on how the term “abstinence” til marriage is not necessarily a bad thing, many of us often beat ourselves up over being a virgin! But, it’s a GREAT thing to hold on to your innocence for aslong as you can. I definitely walked away from this seminar knowing way more, than I did before  I arrived in Atlanta.

Lastly, today during the plenary we recieved the ultimate surprise. That’s right, President Barack Obama sent a video message to Creating Change, during his message he stated “And Today, you’re helping lead the way to a future where everyone is treated equal with dignity and respect, no matter who they love or where they come from.He then concluded his address with these words, “I’m more confident than ever that we’ll reach a better future as long as Americans like you keep reaching for justice and all of us keep marching together.” It seems no matter which session I attened today the message was all the same, Equality never sleeps, we must press on daily working towards the prize which lies ahead. 

 
Until next time

-Tre

Creating Change 2013

“Be The Change” – A Morning with the National Black Justice Coalition

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   Trevoi Crump
  Guest Blogger 
  “Be The Change” – A Morning with the National Black Justice Coalition
 
 
 

Creating Change Day 3! The day started off great. I woke up anxiously anticipating the day ahead not exactly knowing what workshops I would attend. However, once I finally figured out were I was going , I headed over to the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC). Even though I arrived a few minutes late the workshop was very informative. As soon as I walked in  they were at the end of a conversation, that was already in progress, but I did catch the question that was possed. The question at hand was “How do we obtain organizations such as NBJC and other relatable organizations on our college campuses?” Me personally, I thought this was an extremely important topic to discuss, coming from a PWI in Columbia, South Carolina, I found it rather interesting to hear what exactly was going to be said. The response to the question was simple, yet profound. We are the CHANGE, it sounds cliche, right? But it’s true, we must take action on our own campuses if we wish to see change in and around our communities.

One significant thing I will say was pointed out is that, the work won’t be easy and the road will definitely be long! However, again we must create the atmosphere for change to take place. I’m a strong believer in the scripture “Faith without works is DEAD.” So we continue to sit around and wait on someone else, then what will we ever accomplish? President Barack Obama stated “Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers & sisters are treated like anyone else under the law… for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well.”  That statement speaks volumes to the world as well as the LGBT community, it’s time that we stop waiting on others to start the process, when we can start it ourselves!! The NBJC is a great organization, I was extremely excited with all the information, and handouts I recieved. I realize that I now posses the information,  needed to continue on the path that’s already been set for me. But it’s up to me as to whether I progress or fail.

NBJC logo

Until next time.

-Tre

 

Creating Change 2013

The Power Behind Creating Change

 
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  Trevoi Crump
  Guest Blogger 
  The Power Behind Creating Change
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Two words Creating Change … was truly a GREAT experience. This was my first time attending Creating Change, and I must say I was completely blown away. When I first began hearing about the conference, I was a little skeptical about it. I mean, this would be my first time attending something on this capacity. However, days leading up to the conference I became overwhelemed with excitement, it hit me that I was about to partake in something great; not to mention the conference falls around my 20th birthday. Once I arrived at Creating Change it was definitely a lot to take in, so many people, so many exhibitors, and so many sessions to attend; and I couldn’t think of what to do first. I attended the Campus Pride workshop, and I definitely learned a lot. It was really good to hear about how other campuses are including  African-American students in their organizations/ and or activities, this workshop was informative and very descriptive, it’s almost like we viewed the gay lifestyle from every perspective. But it was also intresting to learn how to bridge the gap between those in the LGBT and Heterosexual community. 

It feels great to be here, being in the same room with other activist, leaders and many other LGBT figures is AMAZING!! I am most enthused about seeing so many youth, if I don’t appreciate anything else I appreciate youth who believe in fighting for their rights! I’m excited about seeing what other organizations are doing nationally, as well as locally. Out of all the events I attended tonight, I really enjoyed the Opening Plenary. It was GREAT seeing so many LGBTQ people in the same room, but not just we’re getting along! If we keep at this rate the fight for equality will be a smooth one, not easy, but smooth. Learning to work amongst each other is the first step of many, and I look forward to working with the future activist, leaders and many other authoritive LGBT figures present this weekend.

Until next time.

-Tre